Documentation:Open Case Studies/Sprint/Student Guide

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Open Case Studies
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Open Case Studies
Welcome to the portal for Open Case Studies. We hope you’ll find what you need or jump in and help create new resources where gaps exist.
Associated Pages
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The Open Case Studies portal is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.


Student Role During the Sprint

Below are some suggested student roles during the sprint. These may change during the sprint.

  • Support wiki editing.
  • Correctly format citations, use the Wiki editor to organize the resource correctly (translate written format to the wiki if needed).
  • Find images, work with the librarian to identify additional resources such as videos, images, etc.
  • Respond to case studies from a student perspective.

Student Sprint Process Day 1

  • The sprint will take place between 9:30am-4:30pm on Thursday, May 19th and Friday May 20th
  • The overall schedule has been shared with you in the overall sprint guide. The schedule below is to draw your attention to student specific process and activities

9:30-9:35pm - Warm-up/ Introductions

  • introduce yourself to your faculty pair.

9:35-10:00 am - Review of Sprint Roles and Agenda

10:00-11:30 am - Student Workshop

Facilitator - Erin Fields, Flexible Learning and Liaison Librarian

For this session, we will:

  • Review open licenses
  • Learn attribution (citing) for open resources
  • Identify and locate open education resources for use in the wiki project
  • Understand the elements of citation style in the case studies wiki
  • Apply citations using wiki mark-up
  • Review PURL use in the wiki

Resources for the Session

Activities

Using the Resource guide created for your assigned topic, we will work on finding resources, assigning appropriate citation style, applying PURLs (if necessary) and citing them using the wiki-mark-up. You will also work with your faculty partner to identify resources they will need for their case study, and support the case study structure when required.

10:45-11:00 am - Break and Check in with your Faculty Partner

It's time for you to meet with your faculty partner to learn about what wiki support and resources they need to complete their case study. This is also a good time to establish how you and your assigned faculty member will work together.

12:00-1:00 pm - LUNCH

1:00-2:30 pm - Finding Resources and Working in the Wiki Continued

2:30-3:00 pm - Draft Case Study Checkpoint

At this time you will provide feedback for draft of case studies. Good Feedback is:

  • Specific: Specific rather than general information can help the receiver reflect on actual changes (ie." it would be helpful for me to have a photo or image to illustrate X...."
  • Descriptive: Descriptive rather than judgmental. As a learner, are there concepts or approaches that are described in expert language making it hard for you to understand? How might this be changed?
  • Actionable (Constructive): Feedback directed to elements, aspect of the case study that can be changed and how you would change it. (ie. "You might include this concept/aspect as a different heading."
  • Relatable to you: To make you (or your peers) care about this case study, what needs to happen?

Activity

When giving feedback, we will use the Discussion section of the Case Study Template. For example:

  1. Go to the Case Study that you will be providing feedback on. For example: http://wiki.ubc.ca/Documentation:Open_Case_Studies/LFS/Template
  2. On the top right you will see the Discussion tab. Select the Discussion tab and open it in a new window.
  3. Select the Start a New Discussion link and add your comments.


When writing your feedback, you should answer the following questions:

  • What would make the case study that would make it easier for you to understand as a learner?
  • What additional resources that would have made the case study more interesting for you?

Note: Work on a different case study from your neighbour so you do not save over their comments.

Student Sprint Process Day 2

9:30-9:45 am - Reflecting on Day 1 Process

9:45-12:00 pm - Finding Resources and Working on the Wiki Continued

12:00-1:00 pm - LUNCH

1:00-1:30 pm - Case Study Checkpoint

At this time you will provide feedback for draft of case studies. Good Feedback is:

  • Specific: Specific rather than general information can help the receiver reflect on actual changes
  • Descriptive: Descriptive rather than judgmental. As a learner how easy was this case study to understand? What could be added? What could have made it more interesting for you?
  • Changeable (Constructive): Feedback directed to elements, aspect of the case study that can be changed.

Activity

Participants will present their revised case studies (2 minute) and discuss changes they have made, What they still need to do?. What they have learned in the process? You will provide feedback during the presentation. When providing feedback, consider the following questions:

  • Are there areas of the case study that could be clearer for you?
  • What additional resources or questions could be added to the case study to make it clearer for you?

1:30-3:45 pm - Perspective Sharing Activity

For the perspectives activity the faculty case study writers will be writing a section for each case study about the perspectives that they would bring to this case study according to their discipline. As a student you will be working in two groups and proving feedback for each case study from a learners perspective.

Activity

When giving feedback, we will use the Discussion section of the Case Study Template. For example:

  1. Go to the Case Study that you will be providing feedback on. For example: http://wiki.ubc.ca/Documentation:Open_Case_Studies/LFS/Template
  2. On the top right you will see the Discussion tab. Select the Discussion tab and open it in a new window.
  3. Select the Start a New Discussion link and add your comments.


When writing your feedback, you should answer the following questions:

  • Are there any aspects of the case study that are confusing to you? What are they? What would you need to clarify them as a student working through the case study?
  • Are there resources that could be included to make this case study easier to understand or more engaging for you? What are they? How would you include them in the case study?
  • What questions does this case study raise for you? What would you want to find out more about after reading it?


Note: Work on a different case study from your neighbour so you do not save over their comments.

3:45-4:30 pm - Final Debrief: Referring Back to the Map