Documentation:Student Toolkit/Video

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How does UBC support video creation by students?

Creating your own video has become almost as easy as aiming the lens and microphone at a subject and pressing the record button. Video capture is accessible to many of us and is often built in to may of the devices we use.

You may be creating a video for a course, project or just simply to demonstrate a concept. Whatever the purpose you'll need some equipment and an online hosting service to publish your content. Some examples for student created video at UBC:

If you don't have your own equipment you can borrow some from the Chapman Learning Commons.

Here are some examples of video hosting services:

Need Inspiration?

This is a great example of video as a "how-to". More from ViHart's YouTube channel. Check it out for more inspiration. To see a sample of our own student/staff/faculty created video at UBC, have a look at UBC's YouTube Channel

What do I need to know?

Students are likely to be successful if they play to their strengths and keep it simple. Some additional considerations:

  1. Plan your video assignment as you would a writing assignment - consider the story you want to tell.
  2. Start early and get familiar with the technical resources you will be using.
  3. Play to your strengths and (if possible) form a group for your assignment that includes people with diverse skill sets.

From: The Media Scholarship Project: Strategic Thinking about Media and Multimodal Assignments in the Liberal Arts

5 questions to ask yourself before getting started

  • What's the story I want to tell—why am I making this video?
  • Who is it for?
  • Is the quality (production value) important or is the purpose to document and share?
  • Do I have permission from the subject or representative of the site I am shooting?
  • Do I have all of the resources in place or know where to find them? (storyboard, camera, mic, video editing software, video hosting service, permission forms). See below for resources to support your planning.

You likely have the tools to make a video already, even if you don't have a camcorder. Web cams, digital cameras, and smart phones often have video recording features—many digital cameras even have a simple switch to choose between stills and video.

Most devices record in either the .AVI or .MPG formats, both of which are supported by most hosting services, and the video shot with them can be uploaded directly from the device or after being edited on your computer.

Equipment

You will need to choose a basic set of equipment to create your project. Essentially, your needs can be broken down into the following categories

Video

  • video camera or one of the following devices (with video capabilities):
    • iphone
    • ipad

Audio

  • clip on lavalier mics with extension cords(for most situations)
  • handheld mic (for roving reporter/streeter type video)
  • Rode smartLav Mic - Wired (for iphone/ipad recording)
  • desktop mic (like a Blue)for table top, group recording.

Lighting

Editing

Video editing software: iMovie for Mac, Windows MovieMaker or another free video editing tool.

  • iMovie
  • Final Cut Pro
  • Camtasia
  • Screenflow (for Screencasting on Mac)
  • workstation with computer, monitor and headset

All-in-One

Recommended list for an ipad kit for DIY media production.

  • iPad 16 GB wifi w/ AppleCare
  • Apple Polyurethane Smart Cover for iPad
  • Adonit Green Jot Pro iPad Stylus
  • One Sleeve 11" Black with Shoulder Strap
  • Rode smartLav Mic - Wired
  • Joy Factory Unite Universal Tablet Carbon Fiber C-CLAMP Mount for iPad
  • Audio Extension Cable
  • Apogee MiC Lightning
  • Apogee MIC carry case

Tip: Make sure you have all of the equipment you need and test it (including the transfer to the computer you'll be using) to ensure it is in good working order and the recorded quality is what you need. If you don't have your own equipment you may be able to borrow what you need.

Pre-Production:Planning

The first place to start in planning your shoot is with the story. What's the story you want to tell? Knowing exactly what and how you are going to shoot (your subject) why you are shooting (your message), as well as the audience for which you are shooting, is very important part of planning.

Here are some resources that may help you in this phase of your project:

Storyboard/Scripts

Forms

Production: Creating

In this phase, you will be creating your project. You will have tested your recording device and planned your shoot or screencast with a storyboard.

Here are the resources that will support this phase of your project

lynda.com

Explore the following courses on lynda.com. For registration information, visit lynda.ubc.ca. Take note that the service is only available to UBC faculty, staff and post-doctoral fellows. If you are a student, please see additional resources.

Video Recording and Shooting

  • Foundations of Video: Cameras and Shooting
    This course provides you with the information to start shooting your own movies and videos. It covers topics such as lighting, exposure, sound, and equipment.
  • iMovie for iPad Essential Training
    You can start shooting and editing your own video using your own mobile devices. This course will walk you through the process of recording, editing, and exporting video on your iOS devices (e.g. iPad/iPhone) using the iMovie app.

Screencasting

  • Camtasia Studio 8 Essential Training
    Camtasia Studio is a screencasting program where you can capture what is happening on your computer. This course will demonstrates how to set up, record, edit, and share screencasts for online lectures and assignment feedback.

Production Techniques and Approaches

B-roll Content
Copyright

Do you need to find copyright safe sound or images for your project? The following resources can help:

Image Sources: UBC's Copyright resource provides an excellent list of various "copyright safe" image databases and also includes some discipline specific ones as well.
Creative Commons Guide: UBC's Copyright Guide provides lists of databases for free and "copyright safe" sounds, music and video for your digital media projects. It also helps you understand Creative Commons licenses and how and why you may want to apply one to your work.
Public domain resources: this page provides an overview of what public domain is, how material in the public domain can be used, and much more, including quick tips to check if something is or is not considered public domain in Canada, as well as links to public domain sources.

Students and Copyright

Why should I care about copyright?: this student-centered guide, put together by the UBC Learning Commons team, answers questions on the subject of copyright and addresses a number of myths and misconceptions surrounding copyright.

Post Production: Editing

This is where you will be adding your intro, your credits and acknowledgements (including references to any source material, images, music or video clips you have included) and assempled your project.

There are the resources that will be useful to you:

Or, for students:

lynda.com courses

Explore the following courses on lynda.com. For registration information, visit lynda.ubc.ca. Take note that the service is only available to UBC faculty, staff and post-doctoral fellows.

Video recording and shooting

  • Foundations of Video: Cameras and Shooting
    This course provides you with the information to start shooting your own movies and videos. It covers topics such as lighting, exposure, sound, and equipment.
  • iMovie for iPad Essential Training
    You can start shooting and editing your own video using your own mobile devices. This course will walk you through the process of recording, editing, and exporting video on your iOS devices (e.g. iPad/iPhone) using the iMovie app.


Video editing

Storing and sharing

  • YouTube Essential Training
    YouTube is one of the most popular online video sharing platforms, used for a diverse range of learning goals. This course will show the basics of YouTube from starting an account to some tips in shooting and editing.
  • Vimeo Essential Training
    Vimeo is an online video sharing platform geared towards independent filmmakers and artists. This course provides an introduction to the service's features and tips on editing and compression.

How tos


Publishing your content

When you've finished recording, editing and exporting your content to an acceptable file format, you'll need to publish it so that you can embed it where you like. You can publish your content on:

Embedding your content

Once your content is hosted (on YouTube or Kaltura) you can embed it in a Canvas course, WordPress environment or on a wiki page. See how-tos below.

Copyright

Do you need to find copyright safe sound or images for your project? The following resources can help:

Image Sources: UBC's Copyright resource provides an excellent list of various "copyright safe" image databases and also includes some discipline specific ones as well.
Creative Commons Guide: UBC's Copyright Guide provides lists of databases for free and "copyright safe" sounds, music and video for your digital media projects. It also helps you understand Creative Commons licenses and how and why you may want to apply one to your work.
Public domain resources: this page provides an overview of what public domain is, how material in the public domain can be used, and much more, including quick tips to check if something is or is not considered public domain in Canada, as well as links to public domain sources.

Students and Copyright

Why should I care about copyright?: this student-centered guide, put together by the UBC Learning Commons team, answers questions on the subject of copyright and addresses a number of myths and misconceptions surrounding copyright.

Open Educational Resources

Guides

Research

Highlights

Overview:

Video:

Audio:

  • McGarr, O. (2009). A review of podcasting in higher education: Its influence on the traditional lecture. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 25, 309-321. Ubc-elink.png
This paper examines a possible influence of podcasting on the traditional lecture in higher education. The review explores three key questions: What are the educational uses of podcasting in teaching and learning in higher education? Can podcasting facilitate more flexible and mobile learning? In what ways will podcasting influence the traditional lecture? These questions are discussed in the final section of the paper with reference to future policies and practices.
Reviews how podcasting is currently used in higher education: How it is used in course lectures, pre-class listening materials, and coursework feedback. Includes top tips for podcasters.