User:HanspeterSchreier

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Hanspeter Schreier Image
Hanspeter Schreier Image

Biography

Hans Schreier is a Professor Emeritus in the Faculty of Land & Food Systems, Land & Water Systems Program at the University of British Columbia

His Research Interest are as follows:

Watershed Analysis (System Dynamics & Integrated Approaches)

Land/Water Interactions (Land Use Impacts on hydrology & Water Quality)

Non-Point Sources of Pollution and Cumulative Effects

Water and Soil Quality (Nutrients, Trace Metals, & Sediments Budgets)

Land Degradation Processes and Watershed Rehabilitation

Adaptation Processes, Climate Variability and Water Conservation

Education

  • Ph.D. Geomorphology. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. 1976
  • M.Sc. Geomorphology & Resource Management. University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K., 1973
  • Diploma in Air Photo Interpretation/ Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. International Institute of Aerial Surveys and Earth Sciences, I.T.C. Enschede, Netherlands. 1972
  • B.A. in Physical Geography. University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA. 1970
  • Diploma in Organic Chemistry. National Certification, Basel, Switzerland. 1961

Awards

2008 King Albert International Mountain Award. For scientific accomplishments of lasting value to the world's mountains. The King Albert I Memorial Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland. Award presentation: Sept. 5-6, 2008 in Pontresina, Switzerland.

2004 Science in Action Award: The United Nations International Year of Fresh Water, Science, Education and Conservation Award. For outstanding work in making watershed management knowledge and innovative, cost-effective applications possible in Canada and in Developing Countries abroad. Canadian UN Initiative See: www.wonderofwater.ca

1999/2000 Senior Sabbatical Fellowship, International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Ottawa. July 1999- July 2000. To review Asia Program, assist IDRC Projects teams in the Andes and Himalayan Region in using Internet and multi-media communication tools in their research, identify research priorities for the next five years and develop.

1999 Manaaki Tangata Fellowship, Landcare Research, Hamilton and Auckland, New Zealand: One month fellowship for lecture tour and workshops on Integrated Catchment Management Research (November 1999).

1996 IDRC AWARD. Honored by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) in Ottawa for significant contribution to science in the developing world. Contributions in the effective use of computer techniques and geographic information system in Mountain Resource Management in Nepal. (One of five Canadian Researchers awarded during IDRC's 25th anniversary celebration).

CV

Publications

Refereed Publications (only Last 10 Years)

  • Schreier, H. and L.M. Lavkulich. 2015. Cumulative effects of the transport of Asbestos rich Serpentinitic sediments in the Trans-boundary Sumas Watershed in Washington State. Canadian. Water Res. Journ. Vol 40 (2):262-271. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07011784.2015.1051495 .
  • Lavkulich, L.M., H. Schreier, and J. Wilson. 2014. Effects of natural acids on surface properties of asbestos minerals and kaolinite. Journ. Env. Science & Health A 49:617-624  DOI: 10.1080/10934529.2014.865401
  • Bauge, S.M.Y., L.M. Lavkulich, J. Wilson and H. Schreier. 2014. Comparison of Surface Properties of Synthetic and Soil Struvite. Can. Journ. of Soil Science. 94:1-8. doi:10.4141/CJSS2013-099
  • Khan, I., V. Gannon, C. Jokinen, R. Kent, W. Koning, D. Lapen, D. Medeiros, J. Miller, N. Neumann, R. Phillips, H. Schreier, E. Topp, E. van Bochove, G. Wilkes & T. Edge. 2014. A National Investigation of the Prevalence of Thermophilic Campylobactyer Species in Agricultural Watersheds in Canada. Water Research http:dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.waters.2014.05.027  http://authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S0043135414003807
  • Prystajecky, N., P.M. Huck, H. Schreier, J.I. Isaac-Renton, 2014.  Assessing Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. as a Microbial Source Tracking Tool for Surface Water: Application in a Mixed Use Watershed. Applied & Environmental Microbiology. April: 80:2328-2336 DOI:10.1128/AME 02037-13
  • Lavkulich L.M., H. Schreier and J.E. Wilson.  2014. Effects of natural acids on surface properties of asbestos minerals and kaolinite. Journ. of Environmental Science & Health, Part A. Toxic/Hazardous Substance & Env. Eng. 3
  • http://aem.msubmit.net/aem_files/2013/11/05/00052420/02/52420_2_art_file_1013438_mvs0x7.
  • Dube, M., Duinker,P., Greig, L., Carver, M., Servos, M., McMaster, M., Noble, B., Schreier, H., Jackson,L., Munkittrik, K. 2013. A framework for assessing cumulative effects in watersheds; An introduction to Canadian Case studies. Integrated. Env. Assessment & Manag. IEAM 2012-145-SS.R1   
  • Bauge, S.M.Y., Lavkulich, L.M. and H. Schreier. 2013. Serpentine Affected Soils and the Formation of Magnesium Phosphates (Struvite). Can. Journ. Soil Science 93:161-172
  • Bauge, S.M.Y., Schreier, H. and L.M.Lavkulich 2013. Phosphorus and Trace Metals in Serpentine Affected Soils of the Sumas Basin, British Columbia. Can. Journ. Soil Science Accepted May 7, in Press
  • Beaulieu, M. H. Schreier & G. Jost. 2012 A Shifting Hydrological Regime: A Field Investigation of Snowmelt Runoff Processes and their Connection to Summer Baseflow, Sunshine Coast, B.C. Hydrological Processes, S 179, DOI: 10.1002 /hyp.9404
  • Viviroli, D. R. Archer, W. Buytaert, H. J. Fowler, G. B. Greenwood, A. F. Hamlet, Y. Huang, G. Koboltschnig, M. I. Litaor, J. I. Lopez-Moreno, S. Lorentz, B. Schadler, H. Schreier, K. Schwaiger, M. Vuille, and R.Woods. 2011. Climate change and mountain water resources: overview and recommendations for research, management and policy. Hydrology. Earth System Science, 15, 471–504, 2011. www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/471/2011/ doi:10.5194/hess-15-471-2011
  • Holmes, E., J. Wilson, H. Schreier, & L.M. Lavkulich. 2011. Processes Affecting Surface and Chemical Properties of Chrysotile: Implications for Reclamation of Asbestos in the Natural Environment. Can. Journ. Soil Science, 92:229-242.
  • Brown, S., L.M. Lavkulich & H. Schreier 2011 Developing Indicators for Regional Water Quality Assessment: An Example for British Columbia Community Watersheds. Can. Water Resources Journal,  36(3):205-217 http://pubs.cwra.org/toc/cwrj/current
  • Roa-Garcia, M.C., S. Brown, H. Schreier, L.M. Lavkulich. 2011. The role of land use and soils in regulating water flow in small headwater catchments in the Andes. Water Resources Research, 47, WO5510, 12 p. doi.10.1029/2010WRoo9582
  • Lyautey, E., G. Wilkes. J. Miller, E. Van Bochove, H. Schreier, W. Koning, T. Edge, D. R. Lapen and E. Topp. 2010. Variation of an indicator of Escherichia coli persistence from surface waters of mixed-use watersheds, and relationship with population density and other factors. Journ of Limnology, 24 Dec.DOI: 10.1051/limn/2010033
  • Jokinen, C., H. Schreier, B. Mauro, E. Taboada, J. Isaac-Renton, J. Thomas, T. Edge, E. Topp, and  V. Gannon 2010. The occurrence and sources of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the Salmon River, British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Water and Health 8.2:374-386
  • Teschke, K. .N. Bellack, Hui Shen, J.Atwater, R. C. Miek , H. Schreier and J. L Isaac-Renton. 2010 : Water and sewage systems, socio-demographics, and duration of residence associated with endemic intestinal infectious diseases: A cohort study. Journal Bio Medical Central, Public Health. 2010, 10:767 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/10/767
  • Brydon, J., I. Oh, J. Wilson, K. Hall, and H. Schreier. 2009. Evaluation of mitigation methods to manage contaminant transfer in urban watersheds.  Water Quality Res. Journ. Canada Vol. 44 (1):1-15
  • Brown, S., H. Schreier and L. Lavkulich. 2009. Incorporating virtual water into water management: a British Columbia example. Water Resources .Management. 23:2681-2696 http://www.springerlink.com/content/j86025202n17/?p=084eab4c80b646ecbb448732974399ab&pi=0
  • Marsalek, J. and H. Schreier. 2009. Innovative stormwater management in Canada: The way forward. Overview of the Theme Issue.Water Quality Res. Journ. Canada. Vol. 44, No. 1 v-xi
  • Khan, I., V.Gannon, A. Loughborough, C. Jokinen, R. Kent, W. Koning, D. Lapen, D.Medeiros, J. Miller, N. Neumann, R. Phillips, W. Robertson, H.Schreier, E.Topp, E. van Bochove, T.A. Edge 2009. A methods comparison for the isolation and detection of thermophilic Campylobacters in agricultural watersheds. Journal of Microbio.Methods 79:307-313
  • Wilson, J., S. Brown, H. Schreier, D. Scovill and M. Zubel. 2008. Arsenic in Groundwater Wells in Quaternary Deposits in the Lower Fraser Valley in British Columbia. Canadian Water Resources Journal, Vol.33(4):397-412
  • Schreier, H. 2008. Water for Food and Life: Preparing for Emerging Water Challenges. Journal of Resource Management: Theory and Practice. NZ Natural Resource Law Association 2008:1-13
  • Schendel, K., G. MacDonald, H.Schreier, and L.M. Lavkulich. 2007. Virtual water: A framework for comparative regional resource assessment. Journ. of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management. Vol. 9 (3):341-355 http://www.worldscinet.com/cgi-bin/details.cgi?id=voliss:jeapm_0903&type=toc
  • Smith, I., K.Hall, L.M. Lavkulich, and H. Schreier. 2007. Trace metal concentrations in an intensively used agricultural watershed in B.C. Journ. American Water Res. Assoc. Vol 43(6) 1455-1467.
  • Books and Chapters in Books
  • Schreier, H. 2017. How to maintain environmental services in mountain watersheds when climatic extremes, water demand and land use pressures are increasing. In: Krecek, J, et all (ed.) Environmental Impacts on Ecosystem Services of Headwater Catchments. Part III, Environ services. Chapter 14, Springer Verlag. 139-150 pp.
  • Richardson, J.  Schreier, H. and Harris, L. 2017. Our most precious resource. Reflections of Canada. Iliminating our opportunities and challenges at 150+ years. Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, UBC, pp 83-87.
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Mountain Soils and Human Activities (pp 78-80), and Schreier, H., S. Brown & P. Shah, 2015. Rehabilitating red soils in the Nepalese Himalayas (pp 92-94), In: FAO 2015. Understanding Mountain Soils: A contribution from mountain areas to the International Year of Mountains: Eds. Vita, R, et al. 157 pp. http://www.mountainpartnership.org/news/news-detail/en/c/295710/.  
  • Schreier, H. 2012  Water Management Adaptation Strategies for Land Use Changes and Increased Climatic Variability in Mountain Communities in Western Canada. In. J. Krecek, M. Haigh, T. Hofer & E. Kubin (eds) in: Management of Mountain Watersheds. Springer Verlag, Dordrecht, Chapter 3, pp17-30
  • Schreier, H. 2010 Water management challenges in Himalayan Watersheds. In: U. Bundi (ed.) Alpine Waters, The Handbook on Environmental Chemistry HRC 6;261-272 Springer Verlag , Berlin
  • Brown, S. and H. Schreier. 2007. Introducing innovations into watershed management. In: M.Price (ed.) Mountain Resources Management, Earthscan, pp 99-111
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown and J. MacDonald. 2006. Too Little and too Much: Water and Development in a Himalayan Watershed. IRES Press, 258 pp
  • Brydon,J.,  M.C. Roa, Brown and H. Schreier. 2006. Integrating wetlands into watershed management: Effectiveeness of constructed wetlands to reduce impacts from urban stormwater. In: J. Krecek and M. Haigh (eds.) Environmental Role of Wetlands in Headwaters. Springer Verlag, pp 143-154.
  • Schindler, D, P. Dillon and H. Schreier. 2006. A review of anthropogenic sources of nitrogen. In: Martinelli, L. and R. Howarth (Eds.). Nitrogen cycling in the Americas: Natural and Anthropogenic Influences and Controls. International Nitrogen Initiative. Springer , Kluwer Acad. Publ. NL. 25-44
  • Schreier, H. 2005. Challenges in Mountain Watershed Management. In: Huber, U., H. Bugmann, and M. Reasoner (editors): Global change in mountain regions: A state of knowledge overview. Advances in Global Change Research. Springer Verlag, Dortrecht.  pp. 617-626
  • Schreier, H. 2005. Integrated mountain watershed management using a multi-barrier approach: tools, challenges, and innovations. In: Pierzgalski, E., S. Niemtur, and J. Czerepko (eds.) Protection of Soil and Water Resources in Forest Areas.  Forest Research Institute Warsaw, Ministry of Environment, Poland and FAO, Rom. pp155-162
  • Zandbergen, P, S. Brown, H. Schreier 2005. Watershed Management Education and Training CD-ROM’s. In: R. L. France (ed.). Facilitating Watershed Management, Fostering Awareness and Stewardship. Rowman & Littlefield Publ. Inc. Lanham, Maryland. A Web-Enhanced Book, Chapter 8, pp. 129-143
  • Schreier, H.; Brown, S. and P.B. Shah. 2003. Methods used to address resource issues in integrated watershed management in Nepalese watersheds. Case study 18. In: Pound, B.; Snap, S.S.; McDougall, C.; Braun, A.R. (eds.). Managing natural resources for sustainable livelihoods: Uniting Science and Participation. Earthscan Publications, London, GB. p. 231-234.
  • Schreier, H. 2003. Mountain Wise and Water Smart. In: B. McDonald & D. Jehl (eds.) Whose Water is it?  National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.  pp. 89-102

Other Recent Publications

  • Schreier, H. 2017. Combining extreme climatic events with land use changes: a key challenge for watershed management in mountain communities in Canada. 31st Session of EFC/FAO. Working party on the Management of Mountain Watershed. Management of municipal watersheds in Mountain Regions, FAO Report. 15 pp
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Managing water for environmental services under increased climatic extremes in mountain watersheds. Roberto Tognetti, Giuseppe Scarascia Mugnozza and Thomas Hofer (editors)    Mountain Watersheds and Ecosystem Services: Balancing multiple demands of forest management in head-watersheds. EFI Technical Report 101, 2017 European Forestry Institute, Chapter 3.4. pp 106-114
  • http://www.efi.int/files/attachments/publications/efi_tr_101_2017_tognetti_etal.pdf
  • Schreier, H.  M. Meredith Hamstead, Elise Paré, Neal Klassen. 2016. Evaluation of Community Water Conservation Efforts in the Columbia Basin 2009-2015, Final Report for the Columbia Basin Trust (CBT) Cranbrook, B.C. 81 pp http://ourtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/WaterSmart_Evaluation_FINAL.pdf
  • Schreier, H. 2015  Too Much and Too Little Water; How do we Adapt to these New Conditions. Article to the Watermark  Magazine, B.C. Water and Wastewater Association November 30, 2015
  • Schreier, H. 2014. Integrated Water Resources Management: A Partial Solutions to Address Complexity. United Nation University. Institute for Integrated Management of Material & Resources (UNU-FLORES), Germany. 18pp
  • Schreier, H. 2014 Innovative stormwater management: Translating Science into Actions, Canadian Water Network, NCE, http://www.cwn-rce.ca/assets/resources/pdf/CWN-EN-Stormwater-Report-FINAL.pdf
  • Schreier, H. and C. Wood. 2013. Better by the Drop: Revealing the value of water in Canadian Agriculture. 3rd in a Series of reports by the Blue Economy Initiative. RBC, CWN & Water & Duncan Gordon Foundation: www.blue-economy.ca/report/better-by-the-drop

Conferences & Workshops

Conferences and Workshop Presentations (only Last 7 Years)

  • Schreier, H. 2019. City of Calgary Watershed Health Workshop. Developing Watershed Health indicators, SAIT, Calgary (Invited) March 19, 2019
  • Schreier, H. 2019. Adaptation measures to cope with increased climatic variability. IECA Vancouver Regional Event: Rainwater Management Solution Symposium, Creekside Centre, Vancouver, April 8-2019. Invited.
  • Schreier, H. 2019. Developing Key Opportunities for Capstone Projects for the New Water Resource Certificate Program at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Calgary, Alberta March 20, 2019 (invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Rehabilitating Lake Urmia in Iran. UN-FAO Mission to provide new water to the second largest hypersaline lake in the world that has shrunk by 60% over the past 10 years. Five day field trip and presentations on integrated watershed management. Tabris & Tehran, Iran, Oct 25-31, 2017
  • Schreier. H. 2017.  Too much and too little water, the new norm in cities. Canadian Water Resources Association, Vancouver Chapter, Water Talks. Vancouver City Hall,  Nov 2, 2017
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Adapting to the combined effect of increased climatic variability and land use changes on water resources in mountain communities in Canada. FAO , Ministry of Education, Prague, CZ, Sept. 4-7 (invited).
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Extreme events and land use intensification. A new challenge for water management. Annual Meeting of the Pacific Regional Soil Science Society (PRSSS). At UBC, March 25, 2017 Invited Keynote
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Too little or too much water: Adaptation Strategies for Municipalities. Spring Forum, Red Deer Watershed Alliance. Red Deer, Alberta, February 24, 2017 (Invited Keynote – 2 hours)
  • Schreier, H. 2016 Water Management Challenges in view of increased climatic Variability and Land Use Changes. Watershed Resilience & Restoration Program, Speakers Series, Alberta Government, Calgary, AB, 3 hour invited seminar, March 17, 2016
  • Schreier, H. 2016. New research directions in stormwater management. Resiliency Expert Advisory Meeting, Canadian Water Network, CWN, Toronto, ON: March , 23, 2016 (Invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Community Involvement in Watershed Health Assessments. From pH to plankton: co-monitoring for better BC Water Knowledge . Watershed 2016. POLIS, & SFU, Sept 30-Oct 1, (Invited Presentation)
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Community involvement in University Research. Session on Building Bridges: Citizen, Science & Policy. One Day workshop as part of the North American Lake Management Society 36th International Symposium in Banff, Alberta. (Invited Presentation . Nov. 1, 2015
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Building Resilience into Integrated Watershed Management in View of Climate and Land Use Change.  Session C3 Managing lakes & watersheds for Climate Change. 36th International Symposium, North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) in Banff, Alberta and  Moderated Session A3 on Lake & Watershed Management Nov. 2, 2016
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Water Conservation Challenges in Mountain Communities in the Columbia Basin in Canada. Mountain Climate Conference - 7th MntClim Conference 2016, Mountains without Snow. US Forest Service, Levenworth, WA, USA, Oct 17-21, 2016
  • Schreier, H. 2016. New Approached to Stormwater Management in View of Increased Climatic Variability. Alberta Emergency Management Agency 2016 Stakeholder Summit, Preparing for the new norm. Nov. 21-22, Edmonton (Invited Presentation).
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Cumulative Effects of Increased Climate & Land Use Changes on Water Resources. Annual Conference of the New Zealand Freshwater Science Society, Invercargill, NZ. Dec 5-9, 2016, (Invited Keynote).
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Emerging Issues in Mountain Watershed Management. WEBINAR. Columbia Basin Trust, Community Watershed Network, March 5th, 2015 (invited, 70 participants)
  • Schreier, H. 2015. From Knowledge to Actions: Coordinated and Moderated two Panel Discussion: Resource Development & Agriculture: Securing the Future. Canadian Water Network 2015 National Conference, Ottawa, March 10-12, 2015 (invited).
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Changing the stormwater management paradigm in view of increased climatic variability and Land Use Intensification. Hydro-Eco 2015 Conference. Vienna, April 13-16, 2015.
  • Schreier, H., Lavkulich, L. & Wilson, J. 2015. Changes in the chemistry of Asbestos-rich sediments during river transport. Swift Creek Science Symposium III. Western Washington University, Bellingham, May 8, 2015
  • Schreier, H. 2015. How to adapt to emerging urban water challenges. Conference - Water & Environment Student Talks (WEST), UBC, June 8-9. Keynote.
  • Schreier, H. 2015.Is our drinking water at risk? Water Challenges & Water Solutions in a changing Landscape. Public Discussion organized by the Royal Canadian Institute for Science at the Tellus World of Science in Vancouver, June  23, 2015 One of 3 Panel Members.
  • Schreier, H. 2015 Too much and too little: How to share water in Mountain Watersheds, 30th Session, European Forestry Commission: Working Party on the Management of Mountain Watersheds, FAO, Pieve Tessino, Italy, Sept 22-24, 2015. Presentation, Plus Panel and Coordinated Expert and Stakeholder Dialogue Training 
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Adapting to Extreme Events in Mountains. Perth 3, International Conference on Mountains. Presentation and Session Organizer of: How can Mountain Communities adap to increased extreme events. University of the Highlands and Islands, Perth, Scotland, Oct. 4-8, 2015. Plus session Chair.
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Water Source Protection and Water Conservation. Meeting of B.C. Health Protection Professionals. Kelowna, B.C. November 4, 2015. (invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2015. Canada’s Food Export Strategy in View of Water Constraints. 2015 AIPA Water Conference, Alberta Irrigation Projects Association, Lethbridge, Alberta Nov 23-25. Keynote
  • Schreier. H. 2014. How to reduce your blue, green, gray and virtual water footprint.. Wat-IF Conference: Water Initiative for the Future. Graduate Student Conference, Queens University May 4-6, Invited presentation (70 Participants).
  • Schreier, H. 2014. Innovative ways to deal with urban stormwater in view of increased climatic variability. MAP West Forum: Adapting \Planning & Development Initiatives to Emerging Climate Change Risks on Infrastructure. Insight ALM Event, Victoria, B.C. Dec 8 (Invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2014. How to minimize urban water pollution and protect aquatic organisms. A public talk as part of the West- a water and wastewater talk workshop.Vancouver Aquarium, World’s Ocean Day. June 8, (Invited)
  • Schreier. H. 2014. Energy, Food & Water Nexus, GLOBE 2014 Conference. Overcoming Barriers and Meeting the Challenges of Tomorrow: Leading Change Canada -2014. Moderated Discussion with 150 Emerging Environmental Leader, SFU Wosh Centre, Vancouver. March 25, 2014 (invited
  • Schreier, H. 2013. From Pine Beetle to floods: How communities in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia adapt to increased climatic variability. 29th Session of the EFC/FAO Working Party on Management of Mountain Watershed. European Forestry Commission in Montgenevre, France, Sept 3-5, 2013 (invited).  
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Global Water Challenges. Sustainability and External Affairs Conference. Vancouver Convention Centre, Teck Corporation,  Sept. 27, 2012 (Invited).
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Innovation in Water Management: Virtual Water and its implications for the future of Canada’s agricultural exports in a thirsty world. 4th Ag-Invest 2013. Canadian Farmland & Agri-business Investment Seminar, Bonnefield Assets, Toronto ON, October 23, 2013 (invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Virtual water and food exports: Implications for Canada. National Conference Connecting water resource & changing the water paradigm. Canadian Water Network. Ottawa, March 18-21. (Invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Global & National Context of Water in Agriculture.  Water and Agricultural Roundtable; Blue Economy Initiative Roundtable Event, RBC and CWN, Calgary Alberta June 26, 2013, (Invited keynote)
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Adapting to climate change: Innovative stormwater management. Columbia Basin Trust, Climate Adaptation for Communities, Cranbrook, B.C. Feb 26, Invited
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Integrating communities and watershed management. The blue, green and virtual water cycle. 41st B.C. Water & Wastewater Association Annual Conference, Kelowna, B.C. April 20-24, invited presentation.

Teaching

International Training Courses (Last 7 Years):

  • Schreier, H. 2019. Land Use Change and its impacts on Climate in Mountains. IPROMO Summer course for 30 Graduate students and Professionals from 24 different counties. Organized by the UN-FAO Mountain Partnership Program & University of Turin and Tuscia, in Pieve Tesino. Italy. July 3-18.  (invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2018. Enhancing Resilience in Protecting Mountain Water Resources. IPROMO Summer course for  30 Graduate students and Professionals from 24 different counties. Organized by the UN-FAO Mountain Partnership Program & University of Turin and Tuscia, in Pieve Tesino. Italy. June 18-22.(Invited to teach 3 days of 15).
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Integrated Watershed Management Short Course at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru (PUCP) in Lima Peru. Part of 6 courses for the certificate in Water and Mining between UBC –CIRDI and PUCP. March 31-April 3, 2017. (12 lectures).
  • Schreier, H. 2017. Environmental and economic issues in sustainable mountain development. 10th IPROMO Course organized by the Food & Agricultural Organization (FAO), Mountain Partnership Program. Two days of lectures on watershed management, climatic variability & land use intensification in Mountains. (Invited) 31 Graduate students and professionals from 22 developing countries. Ormea-Pieve Tisino, Italy, July 5-19.
  • Schreier, H. 2016. Protecting Mountain Water resources to maintain ecosystem health. Taught 2 days of a 10 day course on Mountain Protected areas. (30 Graduate students from 24 different counties). IPROMO course organized by the UN-FAO Mountain Partnership Program & University of Turin in Ormea, Italy. July 15-16, 2016 (Invited)
  • Schreier, H. 2014. Climate Change and Mountain Agriculture. Part of the International Course on Mountain Agriculture. IPROMO & FAO - UN-Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome. A ten day training course for 30 Students from 26 Developing Nations. In Ormea, Italy, (2 days of invited presentations on Mountain Agriculture and Water Management). July 7-15, 2014 
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Water Innovation Lab. Two presentations and Resource Person for 100 Young Leaders involved in water resources Waterlution & Canadian Water Network, Kananaskis, AB,  Sept-26-29.
  • Schreier, H. 2013. Watershed Management: Land Use Impacts and Climate Change. Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Mountain Partnership Program: IPROMO course on Understanding Upland Watershed Management. 30 Participants from Developing Countries. Ormea, Italy July 12-22 (Invited

Special Projects Videos and WEB-APP Projects: (Last 5 years)

  • Wilson, J., H. Schreier & D. McHugh. 2014. Innovative stormwater management Video. Fac. Land & Food Systems UBC. (http://mlws.landfood.ubc.ca/videos/
  • Schreier, H., J. Wilson and G. Pang 2013. Urban Watershed Management Textbook for Soil 516 Graduate Course WEB-APP format, Accessible on all mobile platforms : http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp./UWM :  ID: uwm, password: stream
  • Schreier, H. and G. Pang. 2013. Integrated Watershed Management Textbook for Soil 515 Graduate Course WEB-APP format, Accessible on all mobile platforms : http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp.IWM (ID: iwm, password: sediment)
  • Schreier, H. and G. Pang. 2012. Virtual Water and Food. Implications for Canada. Canadian Water Network, National Centre for Excellence and RBC Blue water Initiative. http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp/VWM
  • Schreier, H. 2012. Agricultural Watershed Management Textbook for SOIL 520 Graduate course. WEB-APP format, for all mobile platforms. http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp/AWM  (ID: awm, Password: soilwater)
  • Schreier, H. and G. Peng. 2014. Water and International Development. Textbook for Soil 518. Graduate Course in WEB-APP format. Accessible on all mobile platforms: http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp/WID

Research

Watershed Management

Jhiku Khola Watershed Proiect in Nepal

Nep Irr1
Nep Irr1

Background: 

One of the most intensively used watersheds in the Middle Mountains of Nepal. This 14- year study focused on determining the key processes that affect all land use aspects and their interactions with water. This included land use changes in forestry and agriculture, erosion and sediment rates, spatial and temporal variability in streamflow, water quality, and soil nutrients. The watershed has a high population density, all land resources are being used for biomass production and there is evidence that sustaining forest cover, soil nutrient, water supplies and quality are a major challenge.

Aims:

1.     Determine water and nutrient balances in the watershed

2.     2. Quantify degradation processes (erosion, sediment transport, water quality, streamflow, soil nutrient imbalances)

3.     Rehabilitating degraded land using nitrogen fixing fodder trees and grasses

4.     Improving water supplies (source protection, water harvesting)

5.     Improving water use efficiency (low cost drip irrigation)

Communication of Results:

Schreier, H., S. Brown and J. MacDonald. 2006. Too Little and Too Much: Water and Development in a Himalayan Watershed. IRES Press, Vancouver, 258 pp.

  • Von Westarp, S., H. Schreier, S. Brown, P.B. Shah. 2004. Agricultural intensification and the impact on soil fertility in the Middle Mountains of Nepal. Canadian Journal of Soil Science: Vol. 84(3) 323-332
  • Von Westarp, S. S. Chieng, and H. Schreier 2003. Comparing low-cost drip irrigation, conventional drip irrigation, and hand watering in Nepal. Agricultural Water Management Vol. 64(2):143-160
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, P.B. Shah, B. Shrestha, G. Nakarmi and R. Allen. 2001. Human interactions in soil and geomorphic processes in Nepal: The role of soil fertility in degradation and rehabilitation processes. Intern. Journ. of Applied Earth Observation and Geo-Information, Vol. 3(1):93-98.
  • Brown, S., H. Schreier, and P.B. Shah. 2000. Soil phosphorus fertility degradation: A GIS based assessment. Journal of Environmental Quality, 29(4):1152-1160.
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, and Shah. 1998. Conservation, degradation and rehabilitation; the great Himalayan Challenge. NATO Advanced Research Publication Series: Environmental reconstruction in headwaters Series 2: Environmental Security – Vol. 68:147-158.
  • Allen, R., H. Schreier, S. Brown, and P.B. Shah (Editors and Authors.) 2000. The People and Resource Dynamics Project: The First Three Years. International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Kathmandu. 333 pp.  
  • Brown, S., H. Schreier, P.B. Shah, and L.M. Lavkulich. 1999. Soil nutrient budget modelling: An assessment of agricultural sustainability in Nepal. Soil Use and Management. Vol. 15:101-108.
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, L.M. Lavkulich, and P.B. Shah. 1999. Phosphorus dynamics and soil P-fertility constraints in Nepal. Soil Science Vol:164(5): 341-350
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, and Shah. 1998. Conservation, degradation and rehabilitation; the great Himalayan Challenge. NATO Advanced Research Publication Series: Environmental reconstruction in headwaters Series 2: Environmental Security – Vol. 68:147-158.
  • Schreier, H., P.B. Shah, and S. Brown. 1995. Challenges in Mountain Resource Management in Nepal.  Processes, Trends and Dynamics in Middle Mountain Watershed. IDRC Ottawa, and International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Kathmandu, Nepal, 286 pp.
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, M. Schmidt, P.B. Shah, B. Shrestha, G. Nakarmi, S. Wymann. 1994. Gaining forests but losing ground; A GIS evaluation in a Himalayan Watershed. Environ. Management, Vol. 18: 139-150.
  • Schreier, H., P.B. Shah, L.M. Lavkulich, and S. Brown. 1994. Maintaining soil fertility under increasing land use pressure in the Middle Mountains of Nepal. Soil Use and Management, Vol.  10:137-142
  • Schreier, H. and S. Brown. 1992. GIS Approaches to resolve resource conflicts in the Himalayas. Geo-Info-Systems, Vol 2: 52-56.
  • Shah, P.B., H. Schreier, S. Brown and K. Riley. 1991. (Editors and Author). Soil Fertility and Erosion Issues in the Middle Mountains of Nepal. Workshop Proceedings, Jhikhu Khola Watershed, April 22-25, IDRC, 286

Funding Sources: International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Canada & Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)

Himal-Andes Watershed Comparison

Background:

Eight watershed teams from Nepal, Bhutan, China, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia collaborated in the production of 8 multi-media CD-ROM’s. All available watershed information was collected, incorporated into an integrated watershed framework and common indicators were developed to compare the results. These watersheds are located in mountains and the land use is primarily subsistence agriculture. Each team had to identify the key resource use and environmental issues in their watershed and highlight the most effective method on how to deal with it. Successful techniques that were proven effective were highlighted. A comparative CD-ROM was produce to share experiences and to learn from each other.

Aims:

1.     Determine common and unique resource constraints in each watershed 2.

2.     Conduct a quantitative analysis of land use, natural resource problems, water constraints and food production

3.     Develop common indicators in order to compare the watersheds

4.     Provide case study material of successful approaches in conservation & rehabilitation

5.     Produce all information in a multi-media format for global distribution

Communication of Results:

  • Schreier, H. 2003. Linking the Himalayas with the Andes. Integrated Global Change Programs. Global Change Research in Mountain Biosphere Reserves. The Mountain Research Initiative (MRI), UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere Program (MAB), UNESCO’s Intern. Hydrological Program (IHI). Entlebuch Biophere Reserve, Switzerland. Nov. 10-13. Proceedings 12 pp.
  • Schreier, H. 2003. Linking Himalayan-Andean Watersheds. World Water Forum 3, Kyoto Japan. Special Session organized by UNESCO on “Water Resources Management in Mountainous Areas”. One of six invited Keynote Presentation at the invitation of UNESCO. March 16-17, 2003
  • Schreier, H. 2002. Comparing Andean and Himalayan Watersheds using Information Technology Tools. International Development Research Centre, Ottawa. March 20, 2002
  • Schreier, H., R. Quiroz, and S.Brown. 2001. Linking Himalayan and Andean Watersheds using Information Technology. Worlds Mountain Symposium, Interlaken, Switzerland Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation Sept. 30-Oct. 4, 2000, CD-ROM Proceedings (7pp.)
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, R. Quiroz. 2001. Comparative Watershed Studies: The Himalayan-Andean Watershed Project. Conference on Challenges in Integrated Mountain Watershed Management. International Potato Research Centre (CIP), Lima, Peru, 21-26 August

Funding Source: International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Canada

Land-Water Interactions in the Sumas Watershed

Sumas Asbestos

Background:

The Sumas Watershed is located in the Lower Fraser Valley in B.C. and is intensively used for agriculture. It has some of the highest animal stocking densities in Canada (dairy & chickens). The watershed is a transboundary system between the USA and Canada and a major landslide in the US headwaters exposed a major serpentinitic bedrock formation that contains up to 10% asbestos fibers. During major storm events, asbestos rich sediments are deposited on agricultural land and this poses a major health hazards. The asbestos rich sediment contains high levels of Ni and Cr, which are good indicators to trace the asbestos sediment and its impact downstream. Agriculture contamination resulting from excess nutrient applications (manure & fertilizers) and high Cu and Zn use in animal feed impact the downstream water quality in sediment.

Aims:

1.     Document the impact of the landslide on water quality, sediments from the headwaters to the mouth of the watershed

2.     Show the effect of different agricultural intensifications and their impacts on water quality and sediments in the lowland portion of the watershed

3.     Examine the chemical interactions between the contaminants origination from the landslide with those from agriculture

4.     Determine the physical and chemical changes in the asbestos rich sediment as it moves from the landslide sources through the watershed, using field investigations and laboratory experiments

5.     Provide information on how to remediate the asbestos rich sediment on agricultural land

6.     Determine climatic changes in precipitation and discharge to show if increased climatic variability is accelerating the sediment problems

7.     Evaluate the cumulative impact of increased climatic variability and land use intensification and how this is changing the hydrology, water quality, sediment transport and flooding risk in the near future.

Communication of Results:  

  • Schreier, H. and L.M. Lavkulich. 2015. Cumulative effects of the transport of Asbestos rich Serpentinitic sediments in the Trans-boundary Sumas Watershed in Washington State. Canadian. Water Res. Journ. Vol 40 (2):262-271. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07011784.2015.1051495.
  • Lavkulich, L.M., H. Schreier, and J. Wilson. 2014. Effects of natural acids on surface properties of asbestos minerals and kaolinite. Journ. Environmental Science & Health A 49:617-624  DOI: 10.1080/10934529.2014.865401
  • Holmes, E., J. Wilson, H. Schreier, & L.M. Lavkulich. 2012. Processes Affecting Surface and Chemical Properties of Chrysotile: Implications for Reclamation of Asbestos in the Natural Environment. Can. Journ. Soil Science, 92:229-242.
  • Smith, I., K. Hall, L.M. Lavkulich, and H. Schreier. 2007. Trace metal concentrations in an intensively used agricultural watershed in B.C. Journ. American Water Res. Assoc. Vol 43(6) 1455-1467.
  • Berka, C., H. Schreier, and K. Hall. 2001. Linking Water Quality with agricultural intensification in a rural watershed. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution Vol. 127 (1-4):389-401.
  • Schreier, H. 1987. Asbestos fibres introduce trace metals into stream water and sediments. Environ. Pollution 43: 229‑242
  • Schreier, H., J.A. Omueti and L.M. Lavkulich. 1987. Weathering processes of asbestos rich serpentinitic sediments. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 51: 993‑999.
  • Schreier, H., J.A. Shelford and T.D. Nguyen. 1986. Asbestos fibres and trace metals in the blood of cattle grazing in fields inundated by asbestos rich sediments. Environmental Research 41: 95‑109.
  • Schreier, H. and H.J. Timmenga. 1986. Earthworm response to asbestos rich sediments. Soil Biology and Biochemistry Vol. 18: 85‑89.
  • Schreier, H. and J. Taylor. 1980. Asbestos fibres in receiving waters. Environment Canada Inland Water Directorate (IWD). Technical Bulletin #117: 1‑19.

Funding Source: Environment Canada, Canadian Water Network (NCE), NSERC

Non-Point Sources of Pollution

Nutrient Issues in the Lower Fraser Valley

Background:

The Lower Fraser Valley is one of the most productive agricultural area in Canada. It also has the highest livestock density in the country and as a result of excessive nutrient applications, widespread water quality problems are occurring in local surface and groundwater resources. Numerous studies were initiated to arrive at nutrient budgets to show how much surplus N, P and K is applied and how this is affection the water quality of local streams and groundwater.

Aims:

1.    Determine annual nutrient budgets for N,P.K in 20 agricultural areas in the LFV between 1991 and 2001 to show surplus nutrient applications, using agricultural census data

2.    Develop scenarios on how the surpluses can be reduced using beneficial management practices

3.    Examine the linkages between agricultural intensification and water quality in streams

4.    Determine the agricultural impacts on unconfined aquifers

5.    Use of case studies in three watersheds to illustrate the extent of agricultural impacts (Elk Creek, Sumas and Salmon River Watersheds).

Communication of Results:

  • Bauge, S.M.Y., Schreier, H. and L.M. Lavkulich. 2013. Phosphorus and Trace Metals in Serpentine Affected Soils of the Sumas Basin, British Columbia. Can. Journ. Soil Science 93(3):359-367 DOI 10.4141/cjss2012-138
  • Bauge, S.M.Y, L.M. Lavkulich & H. Schreier. 2013. Serpentine affected soils and the formation of magnesium phosphate (struvite). Can. Journ. Soil Science. 93:161-172  doi.104121/cjss2012-117
  • Smith, I., K.Hall, L.M. Lavkulich, and H. Schreier. 2007. Trace metal concentrations in an intensively used agricultural watershed in B.C. Journ. American Water Res. Assoc. Vol 43(6) 1455-1467.
  • Schreier, H. and S. Brown. 2004. Multiscale approaches to water management: land-use impacts on nutrient and sediment dynamics. Scales in Hydrology and Water Management. Intern. Assoc. Hydrol. Sci. IAHS Publ. Vol. 287: 61-75
  • Schendel, E.K., H. Schreier, and L.M. Lavkulich. 2004. Linkages between phosphorus index estimates and environmental quality variables. Soil and Water Conservation Journ. Vol. 59:243-251
  • Berka, C., H. Schreier, and K. Hall. 2001. Linking Water Quality with agricultural intensification in a rural watershed. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution Vol. 127 (1-4):389-401.
  • Wernick, B.G., E.K. Cook and H. Schreier. 1998. A GIS evaluation of land-use and stream water nitrate-N dynamics in a watershed at the urban/rural fringe. Journ. American Water Resources Assoc. 34 (3) 639-650.
  • Hall, K and H. Schreier. 1996 Urbanization and agricultural intensification in the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts on water use and water quality. GeoJournal: 40, 1-2: 135-146

Funding Sources: Environment Canada, Canadian Water Network (NCE), NSERC

Innovative Stormwater Management

Background:

A collaborative project sponsored by the Canadian Water Network between the Universities of Waterloo, Guelph, the Cities of Toronto and Calgary, the District of North Vancouver, and the National Water Research Institute in Burlington was initiated to show what type of innovative stromwater management tools are appropriate in different climatic regimes in Canada. This is part of the knowledge translation program by CWN to promote innovative stormwater management techniques across the country.  The increases in impervious surfaces and climatic variability are leading to increased urban flooding and there is sufficient evidence to suggest that conventional stormwater systems are no longer adequate to deal with storm events and pollution originating from urban activities. This project covers new ideas on green water management, water harvesting, rainfall interception on site, construction of wetland and detention systems, and conservation. The focus is on promoting low impact design to minimize runoff and pollution.

Aims:

1.     Document successful approaches to reduce the impacts of increased precipitation and impervious surfaces in urban areas in Canada using green infrastructure and green water management techniques (LID)

2.     Assist in the development of a water balance model for urban stormwater

3.     Address how urban  non-point sources of pollution can be mitigated using wetlands and swales

4.     Conduct workshops in different cities across Canada to identify the most appropriate methods to be use to mitigate flooding and water pollution in the different climatic regimes in Canada.

Communication of Results:

Schreier, H.  2014  Innovative stormwater management: Translating Science into Actions, Canadian Water Network, NCE, http://www.cwn-rce.ca/assets/resources/pdf/CWN-EN-Stormwater-Report-FINAL.pdf

  • Wilson, J., H. Schreier, and D. McHugh. 2014. Four Segment  Video on Innovative Stormwater Management http://mlws.landfood.ubc.ca/videos/
  • Marsalek, J. And H. Schreier. 2009. Innovative stormwater management in Canada: The way forward. Overview of the Theme Issue. Water Quality Res. Journ. Canada. Vol. 44, No. 1 v-xi
  • Brydon, J., I. Oh, J. Wilson, K. Hall, and H. Schreier. 2009. Evaluation of mitigation methods to manage contaminant transfer in urban watersheds.  Can. Water Quality Res. Journ. Vol. 44 (1):1-15 ,

Funding Source: Canadian Water Network (NCE)

Arsenic in Groundwater

Background

In the mid-1990’s significant levels of arsenic were found in groundwater resources on the Sunshine coast in B.C. The source was attributed to volcanic fissures within the bedrock. In 2007, high arsenic levels were investigated in the Lower Fraser delta area and were found primarily in wells that drew water from marine deposits. The arsenic source is attributed to sediment deposition into marine environments over geological times. The levels found in drinking water in wells used by individual families where found to well above drinking water health regulations with 43% of the 100 wells having total As concentrations above the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) and another 40% had levels above 0.0003 mg/L. Of all the samples, 2/3 of the high concentration levels occurred in wells that with marine and glacial marine water sources. Specific emphasis was placed on the determination of total and dissolved arsenic because new medical evidence suggests that the dissolved As is of greater health concerns.  

Aims:

1.   Examine the spatial distribution & sources of arsenic in 100 private groundwater wells by individuals in the Fraser Valley

2.   Examine the stratigraphic records to determine the surficial quaternary deposits where the arsenic occurs

3.   Determine the differences between total & dissolve arsenic and other contaminants associated with As.

4.   Develop predictive methods to identify locations where future new wells might be at risk of intercepting arsenic

Communication of Results:

  • Wilson, J., S. Brown, H. Schreier, D. Scovill and M. Zubel. 2008. Arsenic in Groundwater Wells in Quaternary Deposits in the Lower Fraser Valley in British Columbia. Canadian Water Resources Journal, Vol.33(4):397-412

Funding Source: B.C. Fraser Health Authority

Water Footprint and Climate Change

Virtual Water & Global Food Security, Options for Canada

Background:

Global food production will need to be increase by more than 50% in the next 40 years and water is likely the most critical component in order to be able to feed a population of 9 billion. Crops need around 1000 L/kg of water and meat production requires 2-10 more water and countries that are water short will increasingly import water intensive food. Seven countries are currently responsible for more than 50% of the global export of the main staple crops and meat. This makes the global food supply highly vulnerable because major climate events in any one of these countries will affect the globally traded food supply. A series of case studies were produced to show these trends. Canada has significant potential to increase global food exports and because of the rapid changes in diets in emerging countries, one of the attractive economic options is to focus on meat export. As was shown, this is not a very good strategy because meat production requires far more water than crops, livestock is responsible for massive manure production, which is leading to eutrophication in lakes and rivers, and the ruminant livestock produced about 4% of the annual greenhouse gas. Exporters usually do not pay for the environmental damage and Canada’s food export strategy should be to produce crops that have high values, require little water and produce little environmental impact.

Aims:

1.    Identify the key food exporting countries and determine the Virtual Water exports associated with the food production.

2.    Document trends in food imports in selective countries to determine if water considerations are part of the food import strategy (China, MENA, and Canada).

3.    Document the impact & risk of major climatic events in food exporting countries & how this affects the global food supply.

4.    Review the food exports commodities in Canada & determine how much virtual water is involved, what Canada exports.

5.     Provide information on a economically viable, water efficient & environmentally friendly food export strategy for Canada.

Communication of Results:

  • Schreier, H. and G. Pang. 2012. Virtual Water and Food Security: Implications for Canada. WEBAPP, Faculty of Land & Food Systems. http://ubclfs-wmc.landfood.ubc.ca/webapp/VWM
  • Schreier, H. and C. Wood. 2013. Better by the Drop, Revealing the value of water in Canadian Agriculture. CWN, RBC and Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation. http://www.blue-economy.ca/report/better-by-the-drop
  • Brown, S., H. Schreier and L. Lavkulich. 2009. Incorporating virtual water into water management: a British Columbia example. Water Resources Management. 23:2681-2696 http://www.springerlink.com/content/j86025202n17/?p=084eab4c80b646ecbb448732974399ab&pi=0
  • Schendel, K., G. MacDonald, H. Schreier, and L.M. Lavkulich. 2007. Virtual water: A framework for comparative regional resource assessment. Journ. of Environ. Assessment Policy & Management. Vol. 9(3):341-355 http://www.worldscinet.com/cgi-bin/details.cgi?id=voliss:jeapm_0903&type=toc
  • Schreier, H., S. Brown, L. Lavkulich, J. Wilson,  T. van der Gulik, S. Tam, S. Lee, and D. Nielsen 2009. Integrating Blue, Green and Virtual Water: Comparing Irrigation Water Requirements for Different Land Uses in the Driest Watershed in Canada. Final Report for: Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation, Toronto, 61 pp.

Funding Sources:  Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation and Canadian Water Network (NCE)    

Climate Change Adaptations in the Columbia Basin

Background:

The Columbia Basin Trust (CBT) initiated a program to provide mountain communities in the Columbia Basin with scientific information on the potential impacts of increased climatic variability.

The aim was to develop a process and methods to be used to identify main resources at risk, determine the likely probability of different impacts, to determine the vulnerability identify adaptive measure to prevent or minimize impacts. In most communities risks for drinking water, flooding from storm event, forest fires, and food security were identified as the key issues. A multi-stakeholder process was used to arrive at priorities and adaptive measures and several communities have initiated actions to protect or minimize impacts and incorporated the adaptive measures into their community development plans.

Aims:

1.    Develop techniques to measure risk and identify sensitive areas that are likely impacted by greater climatic variability

2.    Develop an adaptation strategy to reduce the risk associated with water resources management

3.    Identify best mitigation, protection, and conservation management practices to reduce the risk.

Communication of Results:

  • Schreier, H. 2017. How to maintain environmental services in mountain watersheds when climatic extremes, water demand and land use pressures are increasing. Part III. Environmental Services in a Changing World. In: Krecek, J, et al (ed.) Environmental Impacts on Ecosystem Services of Headwater Catchments. Springer Verlag. pp. 129-150
  • Schreier, H. 2012 Water Management Adaptation Strategies for Land Use Changes and Increased Climatic Variability in Mountain Communities in Western Canada. In. J. Krecek, M. Haigh, T. Hofer & E. Kubin (eds) in: Management of Mountain Watersheds. Springer Verlag, Dordrecht, Ch. 3, pp17-30
  • Viviroli,D., D. R. Archer, W. Buytaert, H. J. Fowler, G. B. Greenwood, A. F. Hamlet, Y. Huang, G. Koboltschnig, M. I. Litaor, J. I. Lopez-Moreno, S. Lorentz, B. Schadler, H. Schreier, K. Schwaiger, M. Vuille, and R.Woods. 2011. Climate change and mountain water resources: overview and recommendations for research, management and policy. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 471–504, 2011. www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/471/2011/ doi:10.5194/hess-15-471-2011

Funding Source: Columbia Basin Trust

Water Conservation in Mountain Communities

Background:

One of the concerns for mountain communities is the risk of increased climatic variability and land use intensification on drinking water supplies and quality. Since most communities in Canada, use large amounts of water the first short term strategy would be it initiate conservation measures.  The second step is to protect the water source to assure that high water quality is maintained. This second initiative requires source water protection strategies. Based on a reconnaissance survey in the mid-2000’s it was found that most of the mountain communities in the Columbia basin use excessive amounts of domestic water, which in some cases consumption reached up  to 1500 L/P/D. Since little metering and water accounting was practiced the Columbia Basin Trust initiate a water conservation program in 2009 to encourage communities to commit to a 20% reduction in water consumption over a 7-Year period. Some 20 communities accepted the challenge and 14 followed the same monthly protocol that enabled the results to be compared in a quantitative manner. Every community had different combination of issues and challenges but all were able to reduce their consumption between 3-39% and this in spite of experiencing two of the wettest months and one of the hottest summer based on a 100-year historic climate record.

Aims:

1.    Improving the water accounting on a monthly basis

2.    Determining leakage losses

3.    Considering universal water metering

4.    Addressing summer peak demand and winter water constraints

5.    Examining improved strategies to reduce outdoor water consumption

6.    Comparing price structures and ICI rates

Communication of Results:

  • Schreier, H., M. Hamstead, E. Pare, and N. Klassen 2016. Evaluation of community water conservation in the Columbia Basin 2009-2015. Report to the Columbia Basin Trust, Cranbrook, B.C. 84 pp. https://ourtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/WaterSmart_Evaluation_FINAL.pdf https://ourtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2016-12_WaterSmart_Summary_FINAL.pdf

Funding Source: Columbia Basin Trust (CBT)