Library:Library Research Skills for EAL Students

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Brief Introduction

The TLEF Vantage-Library Online Tutorial Project aims to benefit all students registered in UBC Vantage College and has potential benefit UBC students across faculties who attend the Academic English Support Program and also other English as an Additional Language Learner (EAL) studying at UBC.

In order to better help EAL students to efficiently use UBC Library resources, this project offers videos including five different modules, aims to guide EAL students in five different sections of their academic life. In spite of the tutorial videos, there are also knowledge test questions and exercises according to the content of each video, which aims to help students feel more engaging and offers them the opportunity to practice the knowledge they have learned from the videos. In addition, some handouts will be offered with the tutorial videos in case some students may want to download it as a guidance for their activities or future study.

After watching all these videos, students are expected to gain the basic knowledge about using UBC library resources. Before watching the tutorials, part of Vantage students will be asked to participate in a Library Resource Survey to evaluate their initial familiarity with the module content. After watching part of the videos, they would be asked to participate in a following survey to measure their possible improvements. In addition, a series of focus group interview will be conducted with UBC librarians, Vantage instructors as well as Vantage students, to evaluate the effectiveness of the whole project.

Module Overview

Module 1. Profile of an Academic Library

It includes an overview of UBC Library, Library Website, Library Locations and Hours, as well as introductions to librarians. After learning this module, students are expected to gain the basic knowledge and understanding of how and where could they use the UBC library resources.

Module 2. Library Research

In this module, students will learn to develop their research questions, strategies to start their search and how to use different Academic databases according to their specific streams. Finally, they will also learn some advanced search strategies which they could use to make their searching process more efficient.

Module 3. Criteria for Evaluating Information Sources

This module will show students how to evaluate their information sources and how to distinguish scholarly and popular sources.

Module 4 . Academic Integrity

This module is consist of four sections, including why and how to cite correctly , how to use some citation managers, how to how to paraphrase.

Module 5. "AskAway and WriteAway"

This module introduces two of the most popular and practical tools EAL students at UBC could use, AskAway and WriteAway.

Module Video List

Module Videos List

Module Text Content

Introduction

What to Expect from this Course

Welcome to this course on Library Research Skills!

In a series of online tutorials, you will find out what Research Skills are and discover ways to develop and apply them to your studies.


What to Expect from this Course

Please watch the following video to learn how to navigate this website.


How to watch videos on edX

This course contains many video tutorials. These videos are embedded into the website.

Controlling the playback of these videos is quite simple. However, there are a few additional features. The most important of these features is the closed captioning.

All videos on edX will have closed captioning, or subtitles, to help you understand the learning content more easily. By default, these captions appear on the right side of the video player, and will automatically scroll while the video plays.

For more information about how to use the video player in edX, please watch the video below.


Watching Videos on edX

After watching videos in this course, you may be asked some questions about what you learned. If you are unsure of an answer to a question, feel free to return to the video you just watched. To return to the video, simply click the video tab. If you are unsure, follow the directions in the image below. This is an image of the tab interface found in edX.


To go to the next section, click on the "Next" button.
This image shows what the "next" button looks like in edX.

Introduction Pages List

Introduction Pages

Module 1 - Profile of an Academic Library

Introduction to Module 1

Welcome to Library Research Skills for EAL Students - Module 1!
This module contains the following sections:

  • Overview of the UBC Library
  • Library Website Overview
  • UBC Library Locations
  • Reference Services at UBC

Overview of the UBC Library

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What types of information sources are available at the UBC Library
  • How to access the UBC Library website
  • How to find and use the Summon search engine on the library website
  • What types of research assistance services you can receive at the UBC Library
  • Why research assistance services can be so helpful for students at UBC


Video Tutorial

This video will introduce you to some of the information materials and support services available for students at the UBC Library.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.

Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Cite: listing the information sources that you took information from, usually when writing a research paper.
Faculty: the scholarly staff at universities and colleges who often provide instruction, such as a professor
Instant-Messaging: a form of communication where two or more people exchange text messages using computers, phones, or other electronic devices.
Online Tutorial: a learning exercise that a student can complete at their own pace on the computer.
Reference Interviews: a one-on-one meeting in which a librarian gives research guidance and assistance to a student.
Search Engine: computer software that looks for information based on search criteria

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Library Website Overview

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What the main sections of the library website do
  • Where the main search engine is located on the library website
  • How to use the four main search tabs on the main library website


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn how to navigate the UBC Library website.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Article: a piece of writing that is published with others in a collection, usually in a newspaper or magazine.
Background Information: general information about a subject that can help introduce someone to a new concept or topic.
Collections: a group of information sources kept together, such as books or articles in a library.
Discipline: a specific area of learning or knowledge.
Field: a course of study or area of knowledge.
Materials: text written for a specific purpose.
Research Paper: a piece of writing exploring a particular issue or subject.
Subject: the main topic of a paper, discussion, or field of study.
Tailored: adjusted or modified to fulfill particular needs.
Topic: a category or general area of interest.
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Library Locations

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How to identify books from other information materials in the Summon search results
  • How to find a book's availability and library location
  • How library collections are organized
  • How to find the location and hours of operation for each UBC library locations


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn about the different library locations at UBC.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Article: a piece of writing that is published with others in a collection, usually in a newspaper or magazine.
Background Information: general information about a subject that can help introduce someone to a new concept or topic.
Collections: a group of information sources kept together, such as books or articles in a library.
Discipline: a specific area of learning or knowledge.
Field: a course of study or area of knowledge.
Materials: text written for a specific purpose.
Research Paper: a piece of writing exploring a particular issue or subject.
Subject: the main topic of a paper, discussion, or field of study.
Tailored: adjusted or modified to fulfill particular needs.
Topic: a category or general area of interest.

This work is licensed under a [[Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported]] license.

Reference Services at the UBC Library

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What research support services are available to students at the UBC library
  • How librarians can help you get started with your research
  • Why librarians cannot help you edit your writing or complete your citations
  • Where to go to get writing support at UBC
  • How to contact Librarians for help with your research


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn about the role of Librarians at UBC.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Cataloguing: the act of arranging a list or collection of information sources or materials.
Chat: to exchange text messages in real time using a computer or cell phone.
Circulation Desk: the main desk in a library where book lending and other activities take place.
Citations: a list of entries that indicates what information sources, such as books or articles, a person read and discussed in their own written work.
Disciplines: a specific area of learning or knowledge.
eResources: electronic information materials that are available online.
Formatting: changing the way information looks and is organized in a document.
Friendly folks: people who are ready and willing to answer your questions and give assistance.
In-depth knowledge: very detailed or complete understanding of an issue or concept.
Refine: to remove unwanted or unnecessary elements from something to make it more specific to your needs.

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Module 1 Pages List

Module 1 Pages

Module 2 - Library Research

Introduction to Module 2

Welcome to Library Research Skills for EAL Students - Module 2!

This module contains the following sections:

  • Developing a Research Question
  • Starting Your Search
  • Using Academic Databases
  • Advanced Search Strategies

Developing a Research Question

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • Why developing a Research Question is important
  • How to make a Research Question more specific
  • Why it is important for a Research Question to require a detailed response or explanation
  • How to use Reference Materials to guide Research Question development


Video Tutorial

This video will show you how developing a strong research question will make doing your research projects more effective and efficient. Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:

Analysis: an examination or consideration of something in a methodical or detailed way.
Assignments: tasks given to students, such as homework or coursework.
Creative Thinking: considering a problem or situation from a new or unique perspective.
Dictionary: provides the definitions, or meanings, of words and phrases.
Encyclopedia: A comprehensive reference work with articles on a range of subjects.
Evaluation: an assessment of the qualities or characteristics of a piece of writing, an argument, etc.
Handbook: a book of reference on a certain field of knowledge.
Reference Materials: provide background information on a topic and are especially useful at the beginning of a research project.
Summary: representing an information source in a shorter, condensed form.
Topic: a category or general area of interest.

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Starting Your Search

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How to use the main UBC Library search engine
  • How to perform a basic search
  • How to locate and use search filters
  • How to download and view electronic information sources
  • How to generate and save citations for your information sources


Video Tutorial

This video explains how to start searching for high quality information sources at the UBC Library.
Directly under the video, you will find a handout about Starting your Search in Summon. Beneath it, you will find a list of important words used in the video, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Database: a collection of information organized and stored to be accessible by a computer .
Export: to send or save information from a computer to another format .
Filtering: the process of removing unwanted or irrelevant information sources from a search .
Keyword: a word used in information searches to describe the content of a document .
Licenses: allowing others to use a service or product with legal permission.
Phrase: A word or group of words that functions as a single unit in the structure of the sentence.
Precise: exact or accurate.
Publication Details: additional information about an information source, which can include author and length.
Relevant: directly related or connected to a topic.
Scholarly: research materials that are written by experts for an academic audience.

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Using Academic Databases - Arts

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • Why Arts students should use Academic Search Complete
  • What types of information sources are available in Academic Search Complete
  • How to find and access Academic Search Complete
  • How to perform a search in Academic Search Complete
  • How to refine search results in Academic Search Complete
  • How to download and cite information sources in Academic Search Complete
  • How to locate and use UBC Library Research Guides


Video Tutorial

This video will show how to get started using the powerful academic databases that are available at the UBC Library.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Bibliographic: relating to a section of a written work containing citations to all the books referenced in the work.
Criteria: a principle or standard by which something may be judged or decided.
Database: a collection of information organized and stored to be accessible by a computer.
Filters: a way of removing unwanted or irrelevant information sources from a search.
Indexes: a collection containing information about sources of information, including where to find them, but not containing the information source itself.
Interface: a system controlling how a computer user sees and interacts with.
Publication: the release of an information source for use by its audience.
Redirected: to transfer a computer user to a new web page.
Scholarly: research materials that are written by experts for an academic audience.
Summary: representing an information source in a shorter, condensed form.

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Using Academic Databases - Management

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • Why Management students should use Business Source Complete
  • What types of information sources are available in Business Source Complete
  • How to find and access Business Source Complete
  • How to perform a search in Business Source Complete
  • How to refine search results in Business Source Complete
  • How to download and cite information sources in Business Source Complete
  • How to locate additional article databases using the David Lam Library Website


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn how adding or removing search terms can help you become a more effective researcher.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions: Accurate: free from error.
Database: a collection of information organized and stored to be accessible by a computer.
Formatted: the way citation information is organized in a document.
Indexes: a collection containing information about sources of information, including where to find them, but not containing the information source itself.
Publication Details: additional information about an information source, which can include author and length.
Redirected: to transfer a computer user to a new web page.
Refined: precise and freed from imprecision; developed or improved.
Relevant: directly related or connected to a topic.
Summary: representing an information source in a shorter, condensed form.
Valuable: having the quality of being desirable or worthy of esteem.

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Using Academic Databases - Science

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • Why Science and Applied Science students should use Web of Science
  • What types of information sources are available in Web of Science
  • How to find and access Web of Science
  • How to perform a search in Web of Science
  • How to refine search results in Web of Science
  • How to use the "Times Cited" feature in Web of Science
  • How to download and cite information sources in Web of Science
  • How to locate and use UBC Library Research Guides


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn how adding or removing search terms can help you become a more effective researcher.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Abstract or Summary: representing an information source in a shorter, condensed form.
Bibliographic: relating to a section of a written work containing citations to all the books referenced in the work.
Cited: having listed what information sources, such as books or articles, a person read and discussed in their own written work.
Consult: to see the opinion or advice of another person.
Database: a collection of information organized and stored to be accessible by a computer.
Disciplines: a specific area of learning or knowledge.
Indexes: a collection containing information about sources of information, including where to find them, but not containing the information source itself.
Redirect: to transfer a computer user to a new web page.
Relevant: directly related or connected to a topic.

This work is licensed under a [[Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported]] license.

Advanced Search Strategies

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How using advanced search strategies can make doing research more effective and efficient
  • How to use Boolean Operators
  • How to use Brackets and Quotation Marks
  • How to use Truncation Search Strategies


Video Tutorial

This video will show you how to upgrade your research skills using some powerful advanced search strategies.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Combine: to bring together two or more things or activities.
Essentially: basically or fundamentally.
Evaluate: to draw conclusions from examination or assessment.
Exclude: to remove something from consideration.
Fewer: a smaller number.
Refine: to remove unwanted or unnecessary elements from something to make it more specific to your needs.
Relevant: directly related or connected to a topic.
Separate: to divide something into separate parts.
Symbol: a character representing an idea, concept, or object.
Truncation: the act of shortening something.

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Module 2 Pages List

Module 2 Pages

Module 3 - Evaluating Information Sources

Introduction to Module 3

Welcome to Library Research Skills for EAL Students - Module 3!
This module contains the following sections:

  • Evaluating Information Sources
  • Scholarly and Popular Sources

Evaluating Information Sources

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How the lack of control over content authorship can reduce the quality of free online content
  • How an author's motivations and biases can influence their published work
  • Why scholarly information sources are a good choice for use in research projects
  • Why it is important to critically evaluate claims made by all authors


Video Tutorial

This video will show you how to effectively evaluate information sources you find online or at the library.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Affiliations: relationships that form between people and organizations.
Agenda: a temporary organized plan for tasks to be complete.
Amateur Enthusiasts: a non-expert person interested in a particular area or subject.
Credentials: evidence of someone’s right to credit or authority.
Fact-checkers: people who checks the claims or statements of others to see if they are accurate or correct.
Misinformation: information that is incorrect or false.
Retractions: taking back or withdrawing something that has been said or done.
Unbiased: impartial or without bias or prejudice.
Viewpoints: the position from which something is observed or considered.
Wary: cautious of danger, careful, guarded.

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Scholarly and Popular Sources

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • Why discipline-specific vocabulary is used in academic writing
  • Why citations are used in scholarly but not popular writing
  • How the scholarly and popular publication processes are different
  • How publication incentives influence the content of scholarly and popular publications


Video Tutorial

This video will show you how to effectively evaluate information sources you find online or at the library.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Clues: information which may lead a person to a certain point or conclusion.
Densely: in a manner that is compact or crowded together.
Differing Viewpoints: different positions from which something is observed or considered; different opinions.
Distinction: the act of dividing or separating two or more people, objects, or concepts based on their qualities.
Dust Jackets: the sleeve that covers the outside of books.
Formal Review Process: the process of reviewing and evaluating written work to determine whether or not they should be published.
Observations: the act of noting and recording some event, or the record of such noting, such as in an experiment.
Qualifications: the act or process of qualifying, or being suitable for, a particular job or position.
Slick Graphics: images or other visuals that appear expensive or sophisticated, but may actually be untrustworthy.
Trickier: harder to deal with or more complicated.

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Module 3 Pages List

Module 3 Pages

Module 4 - Academic Integrity

Introduction to Module 4

Welcome to Library Research Skills for EAL Students - Module 4!
This module contains the following sections:

  • Developing a Research Question
  • Citing: When and Why
  • Evaluating Information Sources
  • Paraphrasing, Quoting, and Original Ideas

Participating in an Academic Community

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How citations allow expert scholars to communicate ideas over time
  • How the authors of scholarly literature divide their time between research and instruction
  • Why disagreement between the authors of scholarly literature is allowed and even encouraged
  • How citing the work of scholarly authors adds credibility and authority to your work


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn why citation is important, what situations require citation, and how to find out more about UBC's policy towards academic honesty.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:.
Accurate: free from mistakes or errors.
Acknowledge: to say that you accept or do not deny the truth or existence of (something).
Credibility: the quality of being believed or accepted as true, real, or honest.
Citation: a formal public statement that praises a person for doing something good or brave.
Engage: to provide occupation for, to involve..
Expectation: a feeling or belief about how successful, good, etc., someone or something will be.
Expert: having or showing special skill or knowledge because of what you have been taught or what you have experienced..
Novice: a person who has just started learning or doing something.
Publication: a book, magazine, etc., that has been printed and made available to the public.
Trustworthy: able to be relied on to do or provide what is needed or right: deserving of trust.

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Citing: When and Why

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • When to include a citation in your research assignments
  • Why citing is required in academic research assignments
  • Strategies for recording citation information during your research
  • How to find out more information about the UBC's academic integrity policy


Video Tutorial

In this video, you'll learn more about the authors of scholarly research, how these authors communicate their ideas with other experts through publishing literature, and how citing these authors in your own research allows you to participate in this academic community.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.
Click here to download a guide that contains more information about citation management software.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Brilliant: very impressive or successful.
Consequence: something that happens as a result of a particular action or set of conditions.
Define: to explain the meaning of (a word, phrase, etc.).
Involve: to have or include (someone or something) as a part of something.
Meticulous: very careful about doing something in an extremely accurate and exact way.
Paraphrase: a statement that says something that another person has said or written in a different way.
Plagiarism: the act of using another person's words or ideas without giving credit to that person : the act of plagiarizing something.
Quotation: something that a person says or writes that is repeated or used by someone else in another piece of writing or a speech.
Severe: very bad, serious, or unpleasant.
Statement: something that you say or write in a formal or official way: something that is stated.

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Using Citation Managers

To learn more about using citation managers at UBC, click here to download the handout about using citation managers.
To get the in-class exercise of using Refworks, one of the most efficient citation manager you can get from UBC Library website, click here to download another useful handout.

Elements of a Citation

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • How different academic disciplines use different citation styles
  • How to use a style guide to correctly format your citation
  • How to tell the difference between an in-text citation and a reference
  • Where to find additional citation resources when you need them


Video Tutorial

This video will introduce you to some of the most popular citation and will explain how to use style guides to format your citations.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Footnote: a note with added information that is placed below the text on a printed page.
Bibliography: a list of the books, magazines, articles, etc., that are mentioned in a text.
Reference: the act of mentioning something in speech or in writing : the act of referring to something or someone.
Comprehensive: covering completely or broadly.
Format: the form, design, or arrangement of something (such as a book, magazine, or television or radio program).
Element: a particular part of something (such as a situation or activity).
Significance: the quality of being important : the quality of having notable worth or influence.
Punctuation: the marks (such as periods and commas) in a piece of writing that make its meaning clear and that separate it into sentences, clauses, etc.
Discovery: the act of finding or learning something for the first time : the act of discovering something.
Essential: extremely important and necessary.

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Paraphrasing

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What is paraphrasing
  • Why should you paraphrase
  • How could you paraphrase
  • Where to find further assistance for paraphrasing


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn why paraphrasing is important, when you should use it in your research essays, and what strategies you can use to improve your own paraphrasing.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:.
Acceptable: capable or worthy of being accepted.
Contribute: to give (something, such as money, goods, or time) to help a person, group, cause, or organization.
Corpus: a collection of writings, conversations, speeches, etc., that people use to study and describe a language.
Essential: extremely important and necessary.
Implement: to begin to do or use (something, such as a plan) : to make (something) active or effective.
Novice: a person new to or inexperienced to a filed or a situation.
Quotation: something that a person says or writes that is repeated or used by someone else in another piece of writing or a speech.
Restriction: a law or rule that limits or controls something.
Thesaurus: a book of words or of information about a particular field or set of concepts.

This work is licensed under a [[Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported]] license.

Module 4 Pages List

Module 4 Pages

Module 5 - AskAway and WriteAway

Introduction to Module 5

Welcome to Library Research Skills for EAL Students - Module 5!
This module contains the following sections:

  • AskAway
  • WriteAway

AskAway

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What AskAway is
  • The best strategies to use AskAway
  • Where to find more assistance for your research questions


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn about the online library chat reference service called AskAway.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:
Chat Transcripts: a text copy of the messages sent between students and librarians.
Databases: a collection of information organized and stored to be accessible by a computer.
Democracy: an organization or situation in which everyone is treated equally and has equal rights.
Identify: to know and say who someone is or what something is.
Instant Messaging: communication where two or more people exchange text messages at the same time.
Post-Secondary Institution: an organization that provides education for students that have completed high school.
Reference: the act of mentioning something in speech or in writing : the act of referring to something or someone.
Servers: networked computers that store information.
Statutory Holidays: public holidays.
Transcript: a written, printed, or typed copy of words that have been spoken.
Widget: a component of a computer application's user interface.

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WriteAway

Learning Outcomes

In this section, you can expect to learn the following:

  • What is WriteAway
  • The best strategies to use WriteAway
  • Where to find more assistance for your academic writing


Video Tutorial

In this video, you will learn about how using the free online writing feedback service called WriteAway can give you the support you need to improve the quality of your writing.
Below this video, you will find a list of important words used in this tutorial, along with definitions of those words.


Vocabulary

Here is a list of important words with definitions:.
Appropriate: right or suited for some purpose or situation.
Assistance: the act of helping or assisting someone: help or support.
Category: a group of people or things that are similar in some way.
Collaboration: to work with another person or group in order to achieve or do something.
Discipline: a field of study.
Immediate: happening without delay.
Platform: the computer architecture and equipment using a particular operating system.
Revise: to make changes especially to correct or improve (something).
Specific: clearly and exactly presented or stated: precise or exact.
Submission: an act of giving a document, proposal, piece of writing, etc., to someone so that it can be considered or approved: an act of submitting something.

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Module 5 Pages List

Module 5 Pages

Additional Resources

edX Backup File