Course:FRST270/Wiki Projects/Collaborative forest management in relation to recreation in the District of North Vancouver

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Collaborative forest management in relation to recreation in the District of North Vancouver

Abstract

The district of North Vancouver is located on the South-facing slopes of the North Shore mountains across Burrard inlet from the city of Vancouver (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). This includes Mt. Seymour, Lynn Peak, and Grouse Mountain along with the communities below and along these mountains (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). However, this is not to be confused with the city of North Vancouver, which includes lower Lonsdale and the surrounding area (City of North Vancouver, 2016). The district of North Vancouver has a Mayor and Council as the official governing body (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Operations regarding the district of North Vancouver are delegated by the Council to the District Staff and Chief Administrative Officer (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Despite the Council running much of the district of North Vancouver; community committees provide information and advice to Council regarding the public’s concern (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Due to the citizens having an input, they collaborate with the Council to shape the future of the community and forest of the district of North Vancouver. Both interested and affected stakeholders work with the Council as the forests surround and engulf the district of North Vancouver. This results in the management of the forests within the district of North Vancouver. As the North Shore mountains are known for their outdoor beauty along with many recreational activities such as hiking, mountain biking, and skiing/snowboarding; there are many concerns regarding the management in respect to these activities from both the Council and residents in the community. However, through collaboration between the district and community residents, it allows for the forest management in relation to recreation in the district of North Vancouver.


Description[edit | wikitext]

Description of the community forestry case study – Where located; history; national or regional context (if appropriate)

The district of North Vancouver is located on the South-facing slopes of the North Shore mountains across Burrard inlet from the city of Vancouver. This includes Mt. Seymour, Lynn Peak, Fromme Mountain, and Grouse Mountain along with the communities below and along these mountains (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). However, the district of North Vancouver does not include, and is separate from the City of North Vancouver. The City of North Vancouver is located in the centre of the district of North Vancouver which includes Lower Lonsdale and the surrounding area (City of north Vancouver, 2016). Additionally, the City of North Vancouver has separate administrative arrangements compared to the district of North Vancouver.

North Vancouver has a very moderate temperate marine climate due to the warm Pacific Ocean air constantly moving into the region (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). As a result, North Vancouver receives snow at higher elevations during the winter months and moderate summer weather during July and August (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). The moderate climate combined with North Vancouver’s vast greenspaces and forested area, results in an ideal location for outdoor recreation. With the district of North Vancouver’s population being 84,412 and while covering an area of 160.8km2, there is more than enough greenspaces and forested area for residents to use (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). Additional to the greenspaces and forested area, there are two ski facilities within the district borders. Mt. Seymour and Grouse Mountain are both home to advanced, small mountain ski resorts which add to the available recreational options within the district of North Vancouver. Despite the district of North Vancouver having a relatively small population and area, there are plenty of recreational opportunities for residents and tourists.

The district of North Vancouver was formed on August 10, 1891. (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). This was the first municipality on the North Shore until the City of North Vancouver established in 1907 due to the drastic growth of the Lower Lonsdale area (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). In 1912, West Vancouver separated from the District of North Vancouver which further decreased the districts’ size (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). In 1925, the first Second Narrows bridge was built, connecting the district of North Vancouver to Vancouver (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). Prior to the construction of the bridge, the only way to access the North Shore was by boat (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). Then in 1938, the Lions’ Gate Bridge was opened which further connected Vancouver to the North Shore (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). In 1960, the first Second Narrows bridge was updated to be wider and taller to allow for a greater connection to the district of North Vancouver while allowing freighter passage underneath (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). The reconstructed Second Narrows bridge was renamed “Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing” to honour the workers who died in the reconstruction of the bridge (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017).

Tenure arrangements[edit | wikitext]

Tenure arrangements. Describe the nature of the tenure: freehold or forest management agreement/arrangements, duration, etc.

The District of North Vancouver is composed of approximately 160km2 of land (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Of this 160km2, approximately 31.59km2 is under direct district management (District of North Vancouver, 2017). The other 128.41km2 of land is privately owned by companies, businesses, and residents of the district of North Vancouver (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Additionally, the Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish Nation, both first nation communities, own land within the district of North Vancouver (Vancouver’s North Shore, 2017). This land is not managed by the district but is under control of the respective first nation community. The district of North Vancouver is responsible for the maintenance and management of the many public parks and greenspaces throughout the district. Additionally, the district is responsible for the forested areas on Mt. Seymour, Fromme Mountain, and Lynn Peak. However, the district does not manage the ski facilities on Mt. Seymour and Grouse Mountain. The many hiking and biking trails on the mountains in the district can be “adopted” and maintained by associations and clubs such as the North Shore Mountain Bike Association. Despite the trails being located on district land, responsibility for the maintenance of the “adopted” trail is given to the adopting club or association. However, the district of North Vancouver still has the final say on the maintenance and management of these trails.

Administrative arrangements[edit | wikitext]

Administrative arrangements. Describe the management authority and the reporting system.

The district of North Vancouver has a Mayor and Council consisting of 6 Councillors as the official governing body of the district (District of North Vancouver, 2017). The Mayor and Council are then able to delegate operations regarding the district of North Vancouver to the Chief Administrative Officer and District Staff (District of North Vancouver, 2017). An Official Community Plan (OCP) was developed through the collaboration between interested/affected stakeholders and the district of North Vancouver (District of North Vancouver, 2017). This Official Community Plan was approved by Council in 2011 (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Additionally, a Parks and Open Space Strategic Plan was also developed with the help of district residents to create an agenda for the development, renewal, and maintenance of parks and greenspaces for the next 10 years (District of North Vancouver, 2017). The district of North Vancouver’s Council heavily relies on the public’s concern regarding the district’s forests and greenspaces. Through public surveys, workshops, user group discussions, and industry trend analysis reports, the district of North Vancouver has tracked and recorded key park and open space trends and issues within communities (District of North Vancouver, 2017). With the guidance of this data, the district was able to develop the Parks and Open Space Strategic Plan (District of North Vancouver, 2017). The district of North Vancouver relies on the public’s input and feedback regarding recreational greenspaces and forests to further develop and maintain these areas.

Affected Stakeholders[edit | wikitext]

Social actors (stakeholders, user groups) who are affected stakeholders, their main relevant objectives, and their relative power

Affected stakeholders within the district of North Vancouver are residents in the district or user groups of the forests and greenspaces. As the North Shore mountains are known for their outdoor beauty along with many recreational activities such as hiking, mountain biking, and skiing/snowboarding; there are many concerns regarding the management in respect to these activities from both the Council and affected stakeholders. Additionally, as the population of the district increases and becomes more educated, the public will have an increased desire for recreational and leisure activities while maintaining a healthy and functional environment within the community (District of North Vancouver, 2017). This all results in enormous input towards the Council from affected stakeholders regarding the management and maintenance of greenspaces and forested area. Luckily for the affected stakeholders, their voice is heard and highly considered by the Council.

Interested Outside Stakeholders[edit | wikitext]

Social actors (stakeholders, user groups) who are interested stakeholders, outside the community, their main relevant objectives, and their relative power

Interested stakeholders of the district of North Vancouver would be tourists and individuals looking to come to the district to take advantage of the many recreational activities available. As the population of Metro Vancouver region grows, there is an increase in use and possibility of use of the forests within the district of North Vancouver (District of North Vancouver, 2017). Additionally, as many individuals look towards a healthy lifestyle in the 21st century, there is a growing desire for recreational, physical, and outdoor activities. This results in the desire of highly maintained recreational and environmental areas. (District of North Vancouver, 2017). As the district of North Vancouver is known for its exceptional greenspace and forested recreational areas, there is an increase in likelihood of individuals outside the district to become interested stakeholders. However, as the interested stakeholders do not live in the district of North Vancouver, they have no input or say on how the district manages and maintains the greenspaces or forests.

Discussion[edit | wikitext]

A discussion of the aims and intentions of the community forestry project and your assessment of relative successes or failures. You should also include a discussion of critical issues or conflicts in this community and how they are being managed

The district of North Vancouver has been very successful in respect to using residents and affected stakeholders’ input in order to develop a Parks and Open Space Strategic Plan that both the Council and public are satisfied with. By considering district residents’ opinions, statistics show that 61% of North Vancouver residents are ‘very satisfied’ with the services and amenities at parks, while only 4% showed dissatisfaction (District of North Vancouver, 2017). The maintenance and quality of the parks highly improves the satisfaction ratings within the district (District of North Vancouver, 2017). In the past 30 years, the population of seniors within the district has dramatically grown while the percent of young adults aged 20 to 40 has significantly decreased (District of North Vancouver, 2017). It is predicted that this trend will continue into the future resulting in new demands and services to cater to the growing elderly population (District of North Vancouver, 2017). However, the Parks and Open Space Strategic Plan accounts for the decreasing young adult population and growing elderly population and therefore plans for more accessible green spaces and services towards the elderly (District of North Vancouver, 2017).

Assessment[edit | wikitext]

Your assessment of the relative power of each group of social actors, and how that power is being used

Residents of the district of North Vancouver have the largest input towards how the district land is managed and maintained. This is due to all residents being affected stakeholders and living within the district. Affected stakeholders, not necessarily living within district boundaries, have a fairly large input in respect to the management and maintenance of greenspaces and forested area of which they use as they are directly affected by these processes. As there are many public hearings and opportunities for residents and affected stakeholders to voice their opinions, it is quite easy for them to do so. However, interested stakeholders such as tourists or individuals not close to the district of North Vancouver, are unable to easily voice their opinion on management and maintenance. This is due to them most likely not being able to fill out assessments or going to public hearings. Overall, residents and affected stakeholders are able to use their power and influence how the district manages and maintains greenspaces and forests within district boundaries.

Recommendations[edit | wikitext]

Your recommendations about this community forestry project

I believe the District of North Vancouver is doing an excellent job communicating with residents and affected stakeholders in respect to the management and maintenance of greenspaces and forests within the district. Despite interested stakeholders having very little input on district decisions, it’s probably for the best as this group will likely have less knowledge of the community’s ‘wants and needs’. As the Parks and Open Space Strategic Plan accounts for the changing population and therefore the changing needs, I believe this plan has been thoroughly thought out and researched.

References[edit | wikitext]


1. City of North Vancouver. (2016). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://www.cnv.org/get-involved/contact-us/directions-to-the-city 2. District of North Vancouver. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://www.dnv.org/our-government/committees-boards-commissions-panels 3. District of North Vancouver. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from https://www.dnv.org/our-government/mayor-and-council 4. District of North Vancouver. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from https://www.dnv.org/recreation-and-leisure/parks-and-open-space-strategic-plan 5. District of North Vancouver. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from https://www.dnv.org/programs-and-services/seymour 6. Vancouver’s North Shore. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://vancouversnorthshore.com/things-to-do/activities/hiking/ 7. Vancouver’s North Shore. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://vancouversnorthshore.com/things-to-do/activities/mountain-biking/ 8. Vancouver’s North Shore. (2017). Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://vancouversnorthshore.com/north-vancouver-facts/


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This conservation resource was created by Course:FRST270.