Course:FNH200/Lessons/Lesson 13/Page 13.4

From UBC Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

13.4 Summary of Lesson 13

In this lesson you were introduced to the concepts of functional foods, natural health product and probiotics. A few examples of each category have been provided to solidify the concepts. You have also learned about the regulations pertaining these food products.



Authorship:

FNH 200 Course content on this wiki page and associated lesson pages was originally authored by Drs. Brent Skura, Andrea Liceaga, and Eunice Li-Chan. Ongoing edits and updates are contributed by past and current instructors including Drs. Andrea Liceaga, Azita Madadi-Noei, Nooshin Alizadeh-Pasdar, and Judy Chan.

Some rights reserved
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document according to the terms in Creative Commons License, Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0. The full text of this license may be found here: CC by-nc-sa 3.0
By-nc-sa-small-transparent.png


1. Which country led the way in the regulation of functional foods?

Canada
China
Japan
The United States
Korea


2. Which of the following are ways to develop (make/create) functional foods?

By adding vitamins and/or minerals
By adding bioactive ingredients
Produce foods with increased levels of bioactive ingredients through breeding and/or genetic modifications
Produce food with increased levels of bioactive ingredients through processing and/or livestock feeding


3. What type of food is most commonly designed to be a functional food?

Snacks
Desserts
Beverages
Entrees


4. How much probiotic bacteria must be in a food for it to have a physiological effect on the consumer? (cells per ml and at least 100 mL consumed twice per week)

10^4
10^6
10^8
10^10


5. Which one is considered a probiotic bacteria?

Listeria monocytogenes
Lactobacillus acidophilus
Clostridium botulinum
Saccharomyces cerevisiae