404 Page

From UBC Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

404 Page

JODI "404 Page" (1999), digital web medium, colour variations.

404 Page is the title page for the work “404 Not Found %Unread %Reply %Unsent” by JODI, which utilizes interactivity to scrutinize the act of email communication through data debris. [1]

Artist Biography

JODI (jodi.org) is the cooperative of two internet artists, Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans. Combining their backgrounds in photography and video art, they produce original artworks for the web, software art, and computer game modification as art, exploring the relationship between computer technology and users. [2]

Interpretation

404 Page is a digital art piece that challenges the human-digital network relationship. Users visiting this website are greeted with a 404 message on a bright, solid coloured background. Typically, a 404 error message marks the end of a user's interactions with a website, but this 404 page marks the beginning of an engagement. [3] Upon interaction with the website, the user is thrown into a continuous loop of different error pages. These various errors reflect the limitations of the digital network and the errors that are enfolded in the system. [4]

Social Weight

JODI’s engagement with the 404 is part of a cultural trend. This work evokes loss or a missing gap which is a crucial part of the web and highlights the ways in which the system functions and malfunctions. [5] In 404.jodi.org, the user and computer are stuck in a looping error where the user encounters a brightly colored screen with error code "404". [6] In consequence, as Michele White says: spectators see something that is meant to inform them that there is nothing there. Accordingly, it generates an important breach between the intended conventions of the web and the ways spectators read these representations. [7]

Wiki Authors

References

  1. Mulder, Arjen (2000). Book for the Electronic Arts. Rotterdam: V2_Publishing. pp. 174. source
  2. www.net-art.org web related art, JODI bio page. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  3. White, Michele (2006). The Body and the Screen: Theories of Internet Spectatorship. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. pp. 97. source
  4. Nunes, Mark (2011). Error: Glitch, Noise, and Jam in New Media Cultures. New York: Continuum. pp. 47. source
  5. White, Michele (2006). The Body and the Screen: Theories of Internet Spectatorship. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. pp. 97. source
  6. Nunes, Mark (2011). Error: Glitch, Noise, and Jam in New Media Cultures. New York: Continuum. pp. 47. source
  7. White, Michele (2006). The Body and the Screen: Theories of Internet Spectatorship. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. pp. 99. source