Documentation:Open Case Studies/Licensing Citation

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Goals of the Guide

This guide will help users:

  • Identify and describe open licenses
  • Understand how to give attribution to open resources
  • Identify and locate open education resources for use in the wiki project
  • Understand the elements of citation style in the case studies wiki
  • Express the importance of citing in wiki environments and apply appropriate citation

Open Licenses

As defined by Open Definition, "A license is a document that specifies what can and cannot be done with a work (whether sound, text, image or multimedia). It grants permissions and states restrictions. Broadly speaking, an open license is one which grants permission to access, re-use and redistribute a work with few or no restrictions."

There are a number of open licenses that allow for content to be used in a variety of ways. This guide focuses on Creative Commons; however, to find out about additional open licenses, use the resources below.

Understanding the Different Creative Commons Licenses

Creative Commons offers six different licenses that allow copyright holders to apply different restrictions to how their work may be reused. When using a specific CC-licensed work, it is important to pay attention to the CC license and its restrictions. All Creative Commons licenses require attribution. The specific types of Creative Commons licenses are:

Title Image Description
Attribution
CC BY
CC-BY button.png This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the work, even commercially, as long as they credit the creator for the original creation. This is the most flexible and accommodating of the available Creative Commons licenses. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
Attribution-NoDerivs
CC BY-ND
CC-BY-ND Button.png This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as the licensed work is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the creator.
Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC
CC-BY-NC Button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge the creator and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.
Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA
CC-SA button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit the creator and license all new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA
CC-BY-NC-SA button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit the creator and license their new creations under the identical terms.
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND
CC-BY-NC-ND button.png This license is the most restrictive of the six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit the creator, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

License Text and Icons by Creative Commons Organization and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.


The following infographic provides an overview of the different license and their requirements:



Attributing Creative Commons Materials

All Creative Commons licenses require that users of the work attribute the creator. When providing attribution to a CC-licensed work, you should include:

Attribution Example: Castle Stalker (c)Andrea Mucelli, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • the author's name, screen name, or user ID, etc. If the work is being published on the Internet, it is best practice to link that name to the person's profile page, if such a page exists.
  • the work's title or name (if applicable), if such a thing exists. If the work is being published on the Internet, it is best practice to link the name or title directly to the original work.
  • the specific type of license the work is available under. Linking to the license will allow others to find the license terms
  • The URL where the work is hosted
  • Mention if the work is a derivative work or adaptation, in addition to the above, one needs to identify that their work is a derivative work i.e., “This is a Finnish translation of [original work] by [author].” or “Screenplay based on [original work] by [author].”

For in-depth examples on citing Creative Commons images, please see the Creative Commons Image Citation Guide from the UBC Copyright Site.

Resources

Looking for more information on proper ways to attribute Creative Commons licensed recourses? Check out these in-depth guides:

Searching for Open Education Resources

A guide created by UBC Library dedicated to open education and open access resources.

The following guides were developed to suggest tools and sources for finding open education resources. While there are many more resources available to you, the following sources have been evaluated or curated by librarians to make the searching process easier.

Open Education Resource Repositories

An open education repository is an online storage system that allows educators to share, manage and use education resources. The repository contains a collection of learning items that support instruction. These items include: open textbooks, lesson plans, quizzes (e.g. iclickers, etc.), videos, animations, handouts, interactive activities and tools (e.g. apps), and powerpoint presentations. UBC Library has created a guide of vetted open education resource repositories. The repositories have been evaluated according to the Open Education Resource Repositories (OERR) Rubric created in collaboration with 10 academic libraries in British Columbia. The assessment process is ongoing and this page will be updated as new OERR's are added.

Open Access Journals

UBC Library's Open Collections are publicly-accessible collections that reflect the research interests of the UBC community and beyond.

The basic idea of Open Access is simple, make research literature available online, without price barriers and without most permissions barriers (aside from attribution). There are a number of open access journals that can be used when providing instruction in open environments.

  • Finding Open Access Journals Guide
  • Directory of Open Access Journals - This site contains more information on Open Access publishing, as well as a directory of nearly 10,000 Open Access, full-text, and often peer-reviewed scholarly journals. These journals are freely available online, and typically allow authors to retain the copyright to their work.


UBC Library's Open Collections

UBC Library's Open Collections include digital photos, books, newspapers, maps, videos, theses and more. These publicly-accessible collections are constantly growing and reflect the research interests of the UBC community and beyond. Open Collections also allows you to run an API. Run powerful queries, perform advanced analysis, and build custom views, apps, and widgets with full access to the Open Collections' metadata and transcripts.

Citing Resources in a Wiki

Citation Style

Uniformity is the most important part of citing in the wiki as there is no official citation style. It's important to add enough information that a reader can track the citations. This may mean a link to the resource or the full citation information (i.e. author, year, title, etc.). For the purpose of the cases studies, we will use a simplified version of APA style.

The parts of the citation should include the following:

Type of Resource Citation Elements Example
Website Last Name, First Initial OR Website Name. Title of the Entry. Retrieved on (Enter Date) from: URL Wikipedia. Environmental Ethics. Retrieved on April 16, 2016 from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_ethics
Article Last Name, First Initial. (Year) Title of the Article. Title of the Journal, Volume(Issue),Start Page. Retrieved from: URL (If available) Clark, W. C. (2007). Sustainability science: a room of its own. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(6), 1737.Retrieved from: http://www.pnas.org/content/104/6/1737.full
Book Last Name, First Initial. (Year). Title of the Book. Place Published: Publisher. Retrieved from: URL (if available) Imrie, R., Lees, L., & Raco, M. (Eds.). (2009). Regenerating London: governance, sustainability and community in a global city. Chicago: Routledge.

Using Wiki Mark-up for Citing

This is a test citation [1]

  1. Antholis, W., Talbott, S., & Project Muse. (2010). Fast forward: Ethics and politics in the age of global warming. Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution Press. doi:10.7864/j.ctt6wpcv4

To cite the resources that you use in the case studies, you will need to use the following wiki mark-up:

WIki Mark-up What does it do? Example
<ref> </ref> Adds the citation information to the wiki entry.
Environmental ethics expands the study of ethics into the non-human world.<ref>Wikipedia. Retrieved on April 16, 2016. Environmental Ethics. Retrieved on April 16, 2016 from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_ethics</ref>
<references/> Creates the reference/bibliography at the end of the wiki entry. This is automatically updated when you add new citations.
Environmental ethics expands the study of ethics into the non-human world.<ref>Wikipedia. Retrieved on April 16, 2016. Environmental Ethics. Retrieved on April 16, 2016 from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_ethics</ref>

References <references/>
<ref name="Ethics"> Naming a citation allows you to use it multiple times without re-writing the citation.
<ref name="Ethics">Wikipedia. Retrieved on April 16, 2016. Environmental Ethics. Retrieved on April 16, 2016 from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_ethics</ref>

Then at all the other citation points, just enter:


<ref name="Ethics"/>

All Together

Environmental ethics expands the study of ethics into the non-human world.[1]

References

  1. Wikipedia. Retrieved on April 16, 2016. Environmental Ethics. Retrieved on April 16, 2016 from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_ethics

Permanent URL - PURL for UBC Library Resources

UBC Library paid resources are available to access by students, staff, and faculty only. This means that all content in open environments (like this wiki) need to be linked directly to UBC Library and not uploaded to the wiki space. However, to link to a Library resource, you will need to create permanent URL, or PURL. A PURL will allow you to link to a specific resource while off-campus. The PURL will "trigger" system to authenticate users and ensuring that the link will work for off-campus users who have a valid CWL.

To create a PURL you can paste the following prefix directly in front of your PURL (i.e. no spaces between the prefix and the PURL)

http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=

You can also use the PURL generator created by UBC Library. The PURL generator can be found on the EZproxy Toolkit.