Documentation:Open UBC/Open for Learning/Presentations

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The following are openly-licensed slides and resources from open education workshops that have been held at UBC.

Building Digital Literacies: Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Session Description

Wikipedia-based assignments can engage students in an authentic learning experience that involves open collaboration, critical thinking, and knowledge building for a global audience. When students write or edit in wikipedia, they are not using the same format or skills that they would in writing a research paper or persuasive essay – they are applying new strategies to produce knowledge that people will use in the real world and they are building digital literacies. Wikipedia assignments involve fact-based writing skills where students engage with communities other than peers in a classroom, open their ideas up to public scrutiny, and evaluate, create and communicate information in new ways.

Wikipedia assignments are the most successful when the instructor is experienced at editing Wikipedia. This hands-on edit-a-thon will cover the basics of Wikipedia editing and will involve adding citations and new content to Wikipedia.

Finding, Using, and Remixing Open Resources For Your Courses

Session Description

As you prepare for your courses, chances are you may want to incorporate educational resources such as images, videos or quiz questions from different sources into your own materials. There are millions of openly licensed resources, from full courses and textbooks to tests banks and images, that are available for others to freely use. These resources can be modified and adapted to be more useful for your own teaching or learning context. Additionally, these open education resources support the greater worldwide education community by sharing teaching work which may not be as visible as other academic engagement activities.

Are you interested in learning how to find, use, and remix open education resources? Would you like to learn more about how to share resources back to the education community? This session is intended to address common questions concerning openly licensed materials for teaching and learning. Some of these questions include:

  • What is meant by Creative Commons?
  • How do you find and evaluate open resources?
  • What are the key considerations in reusing, reproducing, or modifying these materials?

With the proliferation of open education resources on the web, the practice of finding, evaluating, using, and remixing videos, simulations, test banks, presentations, and other materials is a skill that can help support instructors and students in their teaching and learning. This session will focus on the pragmatic elements of reuse and the basics of working with open education resources. Participants are invited to bring their questions, problems and favourite resources.


The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

Session Description

Note: This 2017 Open Education Week event was a collaboration between Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia (UBC), BCcampus, British Columbia Research Libraries Group (BCRLG) and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and took place on March 28, 2017.

There is little formal evidence that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable; instead, the emerging picture is that open education has been largely embraced as a tool by those already privileged with access to education and learning resources.

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states “everyone has a right to education.” The seminal 2007 Cape Town Open Education Declaration underscores and goes beyond this promise by declaring that open education and the use of OER contribute “to making education more accessible, especially where money for learning materials is scarce. They also nourish the kind of participatory culture of learning, creating, sharing and cooperation that rapidly changing knowledge societies need.” The 2012 UNESCO Paris OER Declaration recommends that governments “promote and use OER to widen access to education at all levels, both formal and non-formal, in a perspective of lifelong learning, thus contributing to social inclusion, gender equity and special needs education.”

However, the question of who is benefiting from open education is still open. The OER Research Hub in their 2013-2014 Evidence Report found that over 65 percent of informal learners using OER had at least a college diploma, with over 20 percent having a postgraduate degree. These demographics echo the demographics of learners found the type of open access courses with the highest profile, MOOCs, where multiple studies have shown at least 80% of MOOC participants have a bachelor degree or higher. At least one Harvard professor has noted: “MOOCs aren’t digital keys to great classrooms’ doors. At best, they are infomercials for those classrooms. At worst, they are digital postcards from gated communities…More than a revolution, so far this movement reminds me of a different kind of disruption: colonialism.” Even for those privileged with access to higher education, open education does not seem to be impacting barriers related to cost; the rate of tuition at Canadian post secondary institutions has been increasing faster than the rate of inflation.

Is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done? This panel will explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education.

As a collaboration between Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia (UBC), BCcampus, British Columbia Research Libraries Group (BCRLG) and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), this event explored the goals, failures, and successes of open education.

Video Presentations

Keynote by Dr. Ishan Abeywardena, Commonwealth of Learning

Panel Discussion

  • Slides available here
  • Panelists included: Juan Pablo Alperin, Christina Hendricks, Jenna Omassi, and Tara Robertson

Open Practices: Teaching and Learning with Wikipedia Roundtable

Note: No slides were used in this session

Session Description

Wikipedia-based assignments can engage students in an authentic learning experience that involves open collaboration, critical thinking, and knowledge building for a global audience. When working with Wikipedia, students are asked to engage with communities other than their peers in a classroom, open their ideas up to public scrutiny, and evaluate, create and communicate information in new ways. When students write or edit in wikipedia, they are not using the same format or skills that they would in writing a research paper or persuasive essay – they are applying new strategies to produce knowledge that people will use in the real world and they are building digital literacies. In this discussion based session, a roundtable of UBC instructors who have integrated Wikipedia-based assignments into their courses will have a conversation and share practical knowledge about their assignment models, what worked, what challenges were encountered, what support they had or needed, and things they would do differently.


Open Scholarly Practice

Session Description

"Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Discussion Notes & Related Resources

Teaching With Wikipedia

Session Description

“Teaching with Wikipedia transforms a classroom’s boundaries. Every day, students write papers, translate articles, or share photos with their class. Wikipedia assignments transform that classroom into a global audience. Students learn, and then share that learning in their own words, for real readers.” Wikieducator

In this hands-on workshop we will share examples of instructors who are using Wikipedia in their classrooms at UBC, consider the value and constraints for using Wikipedia and more broadly explore authentic learning that changes the role of the student from a consumer to a producer of knowledge.

In this workshop we will engage in some “learning challenges” to help us explore different approaches for using Wikipedia in the classroom. We’ll discuss the spectrum of different approaches you can take to developing a Wikipedia assignment and explore some of challenges and constraints using this approach.

Notes and Related Resources


Open Practices: Teaching and Learning with Wikipedia Roundtable

Note: No slides were used in this session

Session Description

Wikipedia-based assignments can engage students in an authentic learning experience that involves open collaboration, critical thinking, and knowledge building for a global audience. When working with Wikipedia, students are asked to engage with communities other than their peers in a classroom, open their ideas up to public scrutiny, and evaluate, create and communicate information in new ways. When students write or edit in wikipedia, they are not using the same format or skills that they would in writing a research paper or persuasive essay – they are applying new strategies to produce knowledge that people will use in the real world and they are building digital literacies. In this discussion based session, a roundtable of UBC instructors who have integrated Wikipedia-based assignments into their courses will have a conversation and share practical knowledge about their assignment models, what worked, what challenges were encountered, what support they had or needed, and things they would do differently.

Teaching in the Open


Teaching in the open is a way to engage learners with the wider­community, give them authentic practice and move beyond “disposable assignments.” Open teaching at UBC ranges from students creating learning objects to share with future classes and the public (using various media), to students editing and creating articles for Wikipedia. These rich learning experiences can offer faculty, students and staff new ways of approaching their teaching and learning and offer a different way of conceptualizing the role of the learner in the production of knowledge. Through open teaching and learning, students have the opportunity to contribute to a body of knowledge rather just consumers of information. Would you like explore teaching in the open in your class? Are you interested in sharing your experience and learning different approaches to open teaching? Do you want to meet faculty, staff and students who teach in the open?

Using and Remixing Open Resources in Your Courses


For students, open educational resources are becoming a core way by which they supplement their coursework. With the proliferation of open education resources on the web, the practice of finding videos, simulations, test banks, and presentations to make clear complex subjects is simply a part of the pathway a student takes to ensure understanding. Additionally, when introduced into a course, open education resources, such as open textbooks, make education more financially accessible. For faculty, OERs offers the opportunity to incorporate a greater range of tools for teaching without the need to develop them from scratch. These resources can then be modified and adapted to make useful for their own teaching context. Additionally, open education resources support the greater worldwide education community by sharing teaching work which may not be as visible as other academic engagement activities. Are you interested in learning how to find, use, and remix open education resources? Would you like to learn more about how to share open education resources back to the education community?

Exploring the Possibilities for Your Classroom


Open practices are enabling faculty, staff and students at the University of British Columbia to open their classrooms, incorporate new resources and perspectives in their learning environments and contribute to their students’ learning beyond the classroom. Through open practices, learners can connect their work with authentic audiences rather than only engaging in what David Wiley calls “disposable assignments”–read by only a teacher or a T.A. and then disposed of, adding no further value to the world. Are you interested in learning more about how to find, curate and use open education resources? Would you like to engage learners in publishing their work and exchanging ideas with a broader community?

Engaging Students In Open Education


Open Education Week Panel hosted at UBC Vancouver
Open education is a hot topic on post secondary campuses these days. This year UBC saw the #textbookbroke campaign led by the Alma Mater society – advocating for the use of open textbooks and open practices in the classroom to reduce costs for students; the adoption of open textbooks and resources in large multi section physics and math courses; and the continuing development of open teaching practices with Wikipedia projects and student produced, openly published content.

How do we engage students with open educational practices that go beyond making their work public to making it re-usable or available for others to build on? Why is open education important to students and to what extent can it enrich the teaching and learning environment?

Speakers:

  • Christina Hendricks: Senior Instructor Philosophy
  • Jenna Omassi: VP Academic & University Affairs
  • Arthur Gil Green Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Geography, BC Campus Faculty Fellow
  • Derek Turner Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Geography
  • Rajiv Jhangiani, Psychology Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
  • Leah Keshet, Mathematics Professor
  • Eric Cytrynbaum, Associate Professor Department of Mathematics
  • Stefan Reinsberg, Physics instructor at UBC

Hanging with the Pack - The Power of the Group in Creating an Open Community


Festival of Learning Conference Presentation
What can a Librarian, a Philosopher, 2 students and 2 ed-tech/learning designer types do together? Lots! Here’s a sample:

  • Develop resources for faculty and students to learn about open - open.ubc.ca (coming soon)
  • Open challenge bank to support faculty development
  • Video interviews to share stories of open practice on campus
  • Open Case Studies on Sustainability (project in process)
  • Teaching with WordPress (experimental cMOOC for faculty development)

Let’s talk about the benefits of serial collaboration and “pack work” - trust, shortcuts, deep conversations (and not-so-deep), online collaboration, etc. - oh yeah, and show some examples of works in progress.

Case Studies on the Student as Producer


Open Education Conference Presentation
The student as producer pedagogical model emphasizes the role of the student as collaborators in the production of knowledge. In this model, the university's approaches to learning and research are closer aligned; for example, students, similar to researchers, are asked to share their work beyond the walls of the classroom and not just with their immediate instructor or advisor. This session examined how educators, through the embrace of open pedagogies, can support learners in their role as active participants in both their learning and their institution's intellectual output. It explored case studies from multiple open courses, assignments, and projects at the University of British Columbia and other institutions that asked learners to not only be students but also creators, authors, researchers, performers, instructors, scholars, designers, and problem solvers. The session provided an in-depth discussion on the how choices around accessible curriculum, remixable content, and extendible technologies can impact student abilities to fully participate and engage as equals in their learning. It also explored best practices for how institutions can establish sustainable frameworks that support emerging pedagogical practices, open education initiatives, and modern web trends, such as open badges, leading to authentic learning experiences that empower students.