Documentation:Digital Tattoo Student Orientation/Tutorial Objectives

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These are the learning objectives for the tutorial resources on digitaltattoo.ubc.ca. These were last reviewed in 2013 when we began to look at the literacies that these resources might support. Related resources:

2013 Objectives

Knowledge Skills Attitudes
Understand the web as a public and permanent space Actively manages application tools and settings to retain the level of privacy that is desirable. Contributes and participates by being authentic and respectful I am a digital citizen with rights and responsibilities.
Understand that participation involves shared interests: yours, your network's and the service providers. Articulate those interests clearly. Engagement:Light: tagging, liking, bookmarking, uploading, editing. Mid-level: uploading, managing, licensing. High: commenting, blogging, curating. Analysis: Investigates and reviews how engagement activity (liking, tagging, commenting, bookmarking or searching builds your profile. Makes a conscious decision regarding participation based on that knowledge. Bigger than "me", contribution, reputation.
Understands the importance of attention in decision making Employs attention, mindfulness and focus to direct action that is consistent with values, intentions and goals Social web tools have a bias towards speed. I can choose to slow down.

2008 Objectives - from project archives

General Goal: For learners to build awareness regarding their online presence, reputation and participation.

Knowledge Skills Attitudes
Awareness of how an individual can be perceived online. Ability to alter privacy settings in web based applications. Clear understanding of personal responsibility in managing online identity.
Awareness of the scope of personal information being shared via the web. Ability to assess personal attitudes and preferences related to online participation and adjust behavior accordingly.
Increased understanding of the benefits of online participation beyond the social. Ability to make choices based on reflection around key questions related to each theme.
Understanding of key vocabulary and concepts related to online identity.

Proposed Digital Literacy Matrix

For reference when thinking about reviewing/revising goals and learning objectives.

This matrix is based on * Howard Rheingold's 5 literacies: Attention, Crap Detection, Collaboration, Participation, Network Smarts [1] and Douglas Rushkoff's ideas about programming [2] and its role in developing digital literacies. More on digital literacy frameworks.

Mozilla's recently published (2016) Web Literacy Framework highlights important literacies for the 21st century. We look to this piece as a guidepost for our work.

Who is a digitally literate person? People with a high degree of digital literacy understand that the internet is a public space and their digital traces have value, both to their networks and the providers of the applications and platforms they use. They understand how the internet works and the processes that allows networks and applications to interact with each other. They participate thoughtfully and make sound decisions about their participation based on personally defined values, goals and intentions.

Competency Strands *Mozilla Literacies Knowledge Skills Attitudes
Exploring Attention Understand your goals, priorities and ask whether or not the action you are about to take is moving you closer to that goal. Practice being mindful and aware of how you are directing your attention online and off. Focus and thoughtfulness require attention. There are no shortcuts.
Exploring Crap Detection Understand the importance of deep research and the impact of bias. Search deeply, be skeptical, think like a detective. Verify with 3 different sources. Look for critiques and alternate view points. Ask the questions "what's in it for them?" "whose voices are heard or not heard?" to help identify bias. Network diversity helps avoid the echo chamber and group think. Verification and authenticity are important to building trust.
Connecting Collaboration Understand that collaboration requires commitment to the collective and shared responsibility for outcomes. Participate through contribution, acknowledging contributions of others. Shared interests, goals, communication and negotiation are required.
Connecting Participation Understand that participation involves shared interests: yours, your network's and the service providers. Articulate those interests clearly. Engagement:Light: tagging, liking, bookmarking, uploading, editing. Mid-level: uploading, managing, licensing. High: commenting, blogging, curating. Analysis: Investigates and reviews how engagement activity (liking, tagging, commenting, bookmarking or searching builds your profile. Makes a conscious decision regarding participation based on that knowledge. Bigger than "me", contribution, reputation.
Connecting Network Smarts Understand that relatively small networks can have large and extending connections (friends of friends). Understand the unique properties of social networks (persistence, scalability, replicability and searchability) and the potential for blurring of personal, private and professional contexts. Manages privacy and customizable settings (including location services) on all social network sites and mobile tools. Trust and reciprocity builds social capital.
Building Code Understand that computer code is comprised of languages that can be learned. Can write some basic HTML and understands the function of other computer languages (Java, PHP, etc.). Understand the basic principles behind APIs (and how they allow social web tools to interact with each other (like Twitter and Facebook for example). We control how computers work.


References

  1. Rheingold, Howard (2012). Net Smart: How to Thrive Online. The MIT Press.
  2. Rushkoff, Douglas (2010). Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commandments for a Digital Age. OR Books.

How Can We Use This?

1. How might we use this to refine our goals?

  • Are there knowledge, skills and attitudes here that would make relevant goals?
  • Which ones?

2. Tagging pages with literacies.

  • Benefits?
  • Implications for digital badges?

3. Reviewing reflection questions for connection to literacy.

  • Value? If we expect site to support digital literacy development in some way, we need to be intentional.

Literacy Tagging Process:

  • each take a section of the site
  • review page content and tag with literacy that is most relevant
    • review reflection questions - how do they support the literacy selected? Revise or add if necessary.
    • review example/video. How does it support reflection? If not, replace and rewrite supporting content.
    • review practical suggestions/ further resources. How does this section relate to literacy, help answer reflection questions and support or relate to video content (example)? Revise think before you ink section as necessary.