Library:Scholarly Communications/Innovative Dissemination of Research Award/2012

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2012

2012: Fisheries portal wins UBC Library’s Research Award


Three members of UBC’s Fisheries Centre are the 2012 recipients of UBC Library’s Innovative Dissemination of Research Award.

The submission from Dr. Dirk Zeller, Mr. Ar’ash Tavakolie and Dr. Daniel Pauly highlighted [www.seaaroundus.org The Sea Around Us Project] portal. This innovative project aims to assess, document and communicate the impact of fisheries on the world’s marine ecosystems, and propose measures to ensure globally sustainable fisheries. Each month, thousands of people access the user-friendly Sea Around Us portal, which provides detailed information from 1950 onward about the world’s fisheries, including the catch and its value, fisheries subsidies and more. All data are global, but can be analyzed by region or country. Maps and figures of the data are also provided so that users can understand the data quickly. As a result, the project portal and databases have become a major source of fisheries information for scientists, environmental conservationists and many intergovernmental agencies around the world. The award winners will be formally recognized by Ingrid Parent, UBC’s University Librarian, at the Celebrate Research Awards Gala on March 8, 2012. Honourable mentions include Dr. Heather Piwowar, Lauryn Oates and Dr. Bonny Norton, and Dr. Erin Michalak. The UBC Library Innovative Dissemination of Research Award honours UBC faculty, staff and students who expand the boundaries of research through the creative use of new tools and technologies.

About the Project

The Sea Around Us project was initiated in 1999 as a large scale collaboration between the UBC Fisheries Centre and the Pew Environment Group. Their aim is to provide an analysis of the effects of fishing on the world’s marine ecosystem and to propose strategic mitigation measures to ensure globally sustainable fisheries.

How does the project reach new audiences?

The database can be summarized through associating data with predefined spatial entities allowing global leading NGOs such as WWF, Nature Conservatory and Oceana a more user-friendly manner to bridge the gap between scientific research and publication.

What is innovative about the project?

Unlike all previous efforts in fisheries science and fisheries conservation science, they created the first and only database in the world which assigns catch and derived information, such as catch values, to biological meaningful and politically possible space, by linking and filtering the fisheries data with the biological distributions of all exploited species, Exclusive Economic Zone fishing access agreements, as well as High Seas spatial fishing effort. Their data is unique in that it presents, for any area in the world, fisheries data in space (i.e., who takes what, where and when, and how much is it worth).

2012 Honourable Mentions


1. total-Impact

Heather Piwowar, Postdoctoral Fellow


About the Project

total-Impact is a website that illustrates an alternative approach to research exploration and evaluation. Its system goes beyond the traditional measurements used in research output, by taking evidence from a wide range of scholarly outputs such as papers, posters, datasets, codes, slides etc. and compiling a permanent URL report for dissemination.

How does the project reach new audiences?

Total-impact aims to report research impact metrics in a new way. The data in total-impact comes from other websites such as twitter, Mendely, Dryad etc. and is aggregated for multidimensional exploration and comparison. This has attracted interest from researchers , research groups and funders who are looking at other types of impact they may be missing when only considering traditional measurements.

What is innovative about the project?

In most disciplines related research findings and ideas are usually disseminated through papers, posters, perspectives, editorials, and blogs. They have rarely been illustrated through an actual working application. For example, surveys have found that scientists want recognition for their research outputs. Total-Impact empowers scientists to initiate this recognition by including the impact of their scholarship on their CVs. Analyses have revealed that traditional citation services omit non-traditional research output (preprints, datasets). Total-Impact demonstrates the implications of this finding. Analyses have revealed many failings of the journal impact factor. Proposed replacement solutions (h-index, etc.) have been based primarily on single dimensional, subscription-based, license-constrained data sources. Total-Impact reveals the possibilities of diverse and open altmetrics and facilitates future experimentation.


2. Research Network for Applied Linguistics and Literacy in Africa and the Diaspora (Africa ReN)

Lauryn Oates, PhD candidate, Bonny Norton, Professor and Distinguished University Scholar


About the project

The Africa ReN project was created as a means of sharing information and building knowledge in the field of applied linguistics and literacy in Africa and the Diaspora. Some of our projects objectives are to promote collaborative research on language, literacy, and learning in Africa and encourage debate on research findings relevant to applied linguistics and literacy research. The project also seeks to be an avenue to mentor research by graduate students and other emerging scholars and share research findings in local, regional, and international research communities.

How does the project reach new audiences?

A portion of a members profile form is published on the website as a means of helping scholars connect with others with similar research interests, facilitating collaborations across disciplines and countries.

What is innovative about the project?

This is the first online research network on literacy and applied linguistics, with a particular focus on Africa and its diaspora. Most dissemination of research in the Education field has relied on the printed word, and most publishers are based in wealthy regions of the world. Apart from South Africa, most African countries struggle to sustain a publishing industry. However, although digital technology in Africa is not as advanced as it is in wealthier regions of the world, digital technology in Africa is improving, and there is great interest in the possibilities of technology to enhance research and research dissemination. Their network is built on a highly collaborative model, with contributions from a wide range of stakeholders. The novelty of their network is its use of new media and online tools, particularly the framework and principles of Web 2.0, to engage a diverse and large research community physically separated by great distances. The network strengthens collective research outcomes through information sharing and communication, mobilized by cost-effective web resources, such as Twitter, to reach members and disseminate information.


3. That’s Just Crazy Talk

Erin Michalk, Associate Professor Postdoctoral Coordinator, Faculty of Medicine


About the project

People living with mental health problems face many challenges that can be exacerbated by the stigma that is associated with their illness. Dr. Michalk has developed a knowledge to action approach through a knowledge translation method that involves the use of drama to share information about mental illness stigma with people with BD and their clinicians.

How does the project reach new audiences?

Through the dramatization of ‘That’s Just Crazy Talk’ the knowledge transfer method engages both clinicians and people with BD and simultaneously, in doing so, potentially allows for dialogue and further knowledge exchange. Events like this will be an avenue for disseminating the intervention to mixed audiences across Canada and the United States in 2012. They are also an excellent means for Dr. Michalk’s team to foster dialogue and collaborative relationships with non-profit organizations, clinician associations, and policy-makers across Canada.

What is innovative about the project?

The field of bipolar disorders research is typified by traditional biomedical model and KT methods, with a heavy reliance on medical ‘expertise’. Dr. Michalk’s program of research gives voice to a variety of additional types of expertise, including that of people with BD and their family members. The multidisciplinary research team Michalk established (CREST.BD, www.crestbd.ca) is the only research group in the world to use ‘community-based participatory research methods’, where the community is actively involved in all stages of the research and KT process. A key innovation of the project is that people with BD and BD healthcare providers viewed the play together and engaged in a post-screening Q&A session. In the performance, dramatic narrative conveys the corollaries of decades of personal and familial mental illness, translating the narrator’s experiences of external and internalized stigma into a vivid, often humorous and sometimes troubled, portrait of life lived with BD.