Documentation:Online Teaching Program/Module 6

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Online Teaching Program
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Workshop Resource Wiki
Welcome to the Workshop Resource Wiki for the Online Teaching Program. Here you find slides, links, and other resources that were shared in workshops.
Modules



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Except where otherwise noted, these wiki pages are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. This page has been viewed over 175 times.

Module 6: Teaching in an online classroom

Success in online teaching is related to how present and engaged the instructor is in the virtual classroom. This module includes practical tips and resources to help you succeed in teaching your course online.

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Online Teaching: Where to Begin?

Virtual Facilitation 201: Building Engagement

Explore facilitation tools and techniques to use in virtual meetings, workshops, seminars, events and programs. Participants will learn from a suite of activities designed to encourage collaboration and build relationships. Through brief role-playing activities, participants will facilitate brief conversations to develop their verbal-facilitation skills and experiment with different tools.

Facilitators

  • Krista Knechtle, Student Engagement Coordinator, Centre for Community Engaged Learning;
  • Michael Denhamer, Educational Programs Director, Centre for Community Engaged Learning

Resources

Session Slides

Unstable Connections: Unmuting Multilingual Learners while Working Inside the Zoom Box

This workshop will explore how to empower multilingual learners through built in redundancies in language and meaning and exploiting the affordances of online education.

Facilitators

Dr. Jodie Martin, Academic English Lecturer, Vantage College

Amber Shaw, Lecturer, Academic English Program, Vantage College

Resources

Session Slides

Session Recording

Making Teamwork Work in Online Courses

Team projects in the online environment provide the chance for students to connect with one another, grow their skills, and deepen their learning. Yet, students often complain about having to participate in team and group projects. Free loading, lack of clarity about purpose, unequal contributions, and scheduling time to collaborate are some of the frustrations students experience.

Come to this session to learn some best practices for creating and supporting healthy team work in your online course.

Facilitators

Isabeau Iqbal Senior Edcuational Consultant, Educational Leadership, CTLT

Jeff Miller, Senior Associate Director, Projects and Faculty Partnerships, CTLT

Judy Chan Faculty Associate/ Faculty Liaison, Land and Food Systems, CTLT

Resources

Session Slides

Session Recording

Building Community Online

Developing and fostering an online community in your course can increase student engagement and motivate students. In this session we explore practical design and teaching approaches to building a Community of Inquiry (CoI). The CoI is a framework that focuses on facilitating meaningful learning experiences through three presences: cognitive, social, and teaching. Join us as we explore practical instructional strategies based in these 3 presences. LO’s

- Explain the idea behind a Community of Inquiry

- Explain each of the three presence necessary for a successful Community of Inquiry

- Select CoI instructional strategies to enhance social, cognitive and teaching presence in your online course

Facilitators

Emily Renoe, Senior Educational Consultant, Learning Technologies, CTLT

Lucas Wright, Senior Educational Consultant, CTLT

Resources

Session Slides

Sincerity, Respect, and Meaning: Virtual Land Acknowledgements at UBC

One thing staff and faculty may have noticed about working at UBC is our commitment to mending, creating and sustaining good relationships with Indigenous peoples, in particular the Musqueam people on whose unceded, traditional, and ancestral lands our Vancouver campus is situated on. Part of this work is reflected in our ability to acknowledge these lands in a sincere, respectful, and meaningful way. For many, the idea of delivering a land acknowledgement can be anxiety provoking, often due to a lack of understanding about what they are, why we do them, and what exactly we’re supposed to say. Join us for this session where we will explore and address some of the barriers we may be experiencing, and begin a learning journey to offering meaningful land acknowledgements.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Further understanding of why land acknowledgements are important part of our work at UBC.

Increased familiarity with resources and educational tools needed to access practical information on delivering land acknowledgements (locate territory, guidelines for when to do them).

Ability to utilize three key considerations for creating a meaningful land acknowledgement as part of our work at UBC.

Facilitators

Kyle Shaughnessy, Education Consultant, Staff Training, CTLT

Amy Perreault, Senior Strategist, Indigenous Initiatives, CTLT

Erin Fields, Liaison Librarian and Flexible Learning Coordinator Humanities & Social Sciences Division Walter C. Koerner Library

Bronte Burnette, Education Resource Developer, Indigenous Initiatives, CTLT

Resources

Session Resources

Using Social Media to Engage Students and Humanize Online Learning

Social media is now a part of our life and our students grew up with Instagram and Snapchat. While an average student spends about 1 to 2 hours on social media daily (Perrin and Jiang, 2018), how can we harness their obsession and engage our students via social media? In this workshop, we will review the construct of various social media and share how we use social media to connect with students in a wide range of classes to share resources and facilitate peer learning. Users analytics on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, and Instagram will also be shared. We will also examine some of the drawbacks of using these tools: privacy matters and overall criticisms, and identify how we can address these challenges when we are ready to adopt social media in our teaching.

Facilitators

Nisha Malhotra, Senior Instructor, Vancouver School of Economics, Faculty of Arts

Judy Chan Faculty Associate/ Faculty Liaison, Land and Food Systems, CTLT

Resources

Feel free to check out these links on your own:

https://twitter.com/NishaEcon

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpIoWqi2Pd7hTcszQ8IgBZA?view_as=subscriber

https://www.facebook.com/groups/968036909937316/+(permission+required)


This page has been viewed over 175 times.