Documentation:Online Teaching Program/Module 2

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Online Teaching Program
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Workshop Resource Wiki
Welcome to the Workshop Resource Wiki for the Online Teaching Program. Here you find slides, links, and other resources that were shared in workshops.
Modules



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Module 2: Getting started with online teaching

This module explores creative student-centred approaches to designing and structuring your online course materials. You will engage in some foundational approaches to creating an inclusive classroom climate and consider effective ways to set classroom expectations in a student-centered syllabus.

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Online Teaching: Where to Begin?.

Inclusive Teaching Online

This session is for anyone who teaches at UBC who is looking for an introduction to inclusive teaching practices. Be introduced to the literature underpinning inclusive teaching and discuss why inclusive practices in the classroom are important, including best practices in the online environment . We will explore diversity at UBC, including who lives and studies here. You will have an opportunity to learn, discuss and share inclusive teaching practices. You will leave the workshop with a range of practices and resources to continue exploring.

Facilitators

Susan Hampton, Educational Consultant: Facilitation and Process Design, CTLT

Gillian Gerhard, Senior Manager, Teaching and Learning, CTLT

kele fleming, Associate Director, Teaching and Learning Professional Development, CTLT

Resources

Session Recording

Session Slides

The land you live on: Native Land

CTLT Indigenous Initiatives is excited to host Christine McRae, Executive Director of the web-based resource, Native-Land (www.native-land.ca) Native-Land brings about discussions of colonization, land rights, language, and Indigenous history tied to our personal histories. In this session we will learn about ways that Native-Land Digital encourages education and engagement on topics of Indigenous land—particularly, where you are located. Please join us to learn more about ways that you can discuss the rich and diverse cultures that have evolved from the land where you teach and live. We look forward to meeting you!

Facilitators

Christine McRae, Amy Perreault, Emily Renoe

Resources

Centring Indigenous Perspectives in Online Spaces

Please join us in learning about how online spaces can host conversations around decolonizing and Indigenous-centred practices. CTLT Indigenous Initiatives resources will be presented and a discussion around ways that these resources can be brought into your classroom.

Facilitators

  • Kyle Shaughnessy, Education Consultant, Staff Training, CTLT
  • Erin Yun, Educational Consultant, Classroom and Campus Climate, CTLT
  • Amy Perreault, Senior Strategist, Indigenous Initiatives, CTLT
  • Karleen Delaurier-Lyle, Reference Librarian Xwi7xwa Library

Resources

Centring Indigenous Voices in Your Course Syllabus

As you fill your basket with reading contenders for your online courses, you may be wondering how to bring in a variety of Indigenous perspectives relevant to the learning objectives. You may also have concerns about designing your assignments about Indigenous topics in ways that the library has appropriate e-materials to support. This workshop will introduce you to the curated resources and expertise available from the Xwi7xwa Library that we want you to know about as you as you design these critical course components. Not ready to work with a Librarian directly? We will show you some helpful tips and new tools to help you discover relevant Indigenous content in the UBC Library more efficiently independently, too!

Facilitators

Sarah Dupont, Head, Xwi7xwa Library Xwi7xwa Library First Nations House of Learning

Amy Perreault, Senior Strategist, Indigenous Initiatives, CTLT

Resources

Please contact Sarah or Amy

Writing a (Mindful) Learner-Centred and Inclusive Syllabus

Your syllabus is an important document that introduces the course and you to the students. It also sets forth your responsibilities and those of your students. Though templates exist for syllabus creation, there are many choices and a multitude of subtleties to consider when designing this document. In this session, we explore the characteristics and benefits of a mindful, learner-centered, inclusive syllabus, including considerations for the online environment.

By the end of this workshop, learners will be able to:

• Explain the purpose(s) and benefits of an inclusive and learner-centered syllabus, from both the students’ and the instructor’s perspectives.

• Critically discuss elements of an inclusive and learner-centered syllabus.

• Identify strategies for consideration when developing an inclusive and learner-centered syllabus, particularly for the online environment.

Facilitators

Gail Hammond, PhD, RD, Faculty of Land & Food Systems

Sue Hampton, Educational Consultant, TLPD

Resources

Slide notes [pdf]

Session Recording

Session Slides

Cultivating Students' Understanding of Academic Integrity in our Online and Face-To-Face Courses

Academic integrity is a core expectation of how we conduct ourselves in the scholarly community. But, beyond warnings to not commit academic misconduct (building on a default deficiency model that assumes students – or, at least, some students—will cheat), we don’t typically address this topic with our students, the newest members of this community. This gap between implicit expectation and explicit instruction can cause serious challenges for students, who don’t necessarily know why we care so much about academic integrity, or how to apply this concept when it comes to doing their own work. We risk causing institutional harm by punishing students for knowledge they don’t have (Kier 2014), not only about academic integrity but also about the university and its practices. We therefore have opportunities to design our courses in ways that, instead, make academic integrity an explicit and attainable part of our teaching and learning. Such course design builds on questions such as these: How do we invite students to work with academic integrity in our online and face-to-face courses and support them in that work? How can we foster students’ understanding of not only what academic integrity means, but why it matters, without focusing on policies and consequences for misconduct? How can we help our students put this concept into practice in their different courses and contexts, including online?

This session shares the findings of a three-year project in first-year writing courses that has investigated new ways to cultivate academic integrity and illustrates how these findings can shape course design that cultivates academic integrity. We will ask participants to reflect on their own teaching practices as part of a wider discussion of how we teach academic integrity, and identify opportunities in those practices to better support student learning and application of this core concept. In this session, you will learn strategies for embedding instruction on and expectations about ethical knowledge production in your course in ways that help students understand what academic integrity means, why it matters, and how they can meet those expectations.

Facilitators

Dr Laurie McNeill Director, Arts First-Year & Interdisciplinary Programs, & Chair, Arts Studies in Research & Writing

Senior Instructor, Department of English Language and Literatures and School of Journalism, Writing, and Media

Resources

Session Recording

Cultivating an Inclusive Climate in Online Classrooms

What should you consider when establishing a classroom climate in an online environment that is conducive to learning for all students? This workshop invites participants to critically unpack their assumptions and expectations around classroom conduct and identify some first steps toward cultivating an inclusive climate in online classrooms with equity and inclusion in mind.

Facilitators

Natasha Fox,

Hanae Tsukada, Educational Strategist, CTLT

Resources

Cultivating an Inclusive Climate in Online Classrooms

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Online Classrooms: Where to Begin?

More resources on Inclusive Teaching