Difference between revisions of "Course:FRST270/Wiki Projects/Munduruku Indigenous People versus forest concessions in the Tapajós region Para state Brazil"

From UBC Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Affected Stakeholders)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
'''Munduruku Indigenous People versus forest concessions in the Tapajós region, Para state, Brazil'''
 
'''Munduruku Indigenous People versus forest concessions in the Tapajós region, Para state, Brazil'''
  
This case study reveals the conflicts between Munduruku indigenous peoples and Brazil federal government about a forest area in the Tapajos region, Para state, Brazil. Along the Tapajos river, Brazilian government was planning to build 43 hydropower dams, which would damage the rainforest ecosystem and flood the indigenous land lived by Munduruku peoples for centuries. A series of documentations present how indigenous people and the authorities view the forest with different values, leading to the disagreements upon the decisions made. Ignorance on the petition of recognition of indigenous land and continuing the hydropower plans has prompted protest and violent repressions due to future destruction at Munduruku territory, which hold the history and cultural of Munduruku people. With the support of local ministry, Munduruku people stand up and defend their rights of the forests and forest from other interest stakeholders. This case study requires future monitoring since the conflicts started in  
+
This case study reveals the conflicts between Munduruku indigenous peoples and Brazil federal government about a forest area in the Tapajos region, Para state, Brazil. Along the Tapajos river, Brazilian government was planning to build 43 hydropower dams, which would damage the rainforest ecosystem and flood the indigenous land lived by Munduruku peoples for centuries. A series of documentations present how indigenous people and the authorities view the forest with different values, leading to the disagreements upon the decisions made. Ignorance on the petition of recognition of indigenous land and continuing the hydropower plans has prompted protest and violent repressions due to future destruction at Munduruku territory, which holds the history and cultural of Munduruku people. With the support of local ministry, Munduruku people stand up and defend their rights of the forests and forest from other interest stakeholders. This case study requires future monitoring since the conflicts started in  
  
 
==Introduction==
 
==Introduction==
 
==== Loaction ====
 
==== Loaction ====
 
This case study is focused in Tapajos region, which located in between the states of Mato Grosso and Para within the Amazon rainforest zone, Brazil. The Tapajos river basin covers around 492,000 km<sup>2</sup> of the Amazon. The biodiversity and geographic characteristic of Amazon rainforest is a natural history, as well as a cultural history.  
 
This case study is focused in Tapajos region, which located in between the states of Mato Grosso and Para within the Amazon rainforest zone, Brazil. The Tapajos river basin covers around 492,000 km<sup>2</sup> of the Amazon. The biodiversity and geographic characteristic of Amazon rainforest is a natural history, as well as a cultural history.  
==== The Munduruku Community and History ====
+
==== The Mundurukus ====
The Munduruku indigenous people have been living in the Amazon region for thousands of years before the arrival and colonization of European. The Munduruku culture and history are memorized and passed down to the next generation with their traditional knowledge of agriculture, their customary land and sacred sites of Sete Quedas at Tapajos basin. Although the population is separated into several groups, there are about 12,000 Munduruku Indians lived by the Tapajos river now. The long-period residence of Munduruku people positively contributes to Amazon rainforest's ecosystem with Amazonia dark earth, which is a new type of soil with rich nutrient.
+
The Munduruku indigenous people have been living in the Amazon region for thousands of years before the arrival and colonization of European. The Munduruku culture and history are memorized and passed down to the next generation with their traditional knowledge of agriculture, their customary land and sacred sites of Sete Quedas at Tapajos basin. Although the population is separated into several groups, there are about 12,000 Munduruku Indians lived by the Tapajos river now.
 
==== The Tapajos dams ====
 
==== The Tapajos dams ====
 
Brazil plans to build 43 large hydropower dams in the Tapajos Basin along Tapajos river and its two branches, the Jurena river and Teles Pires river, turning the waterways into important industrial transportation pathways for transporting agricultural products, mostly soybean. According to Ten-year Energy Expansion Plan 2022, the state of Brazil is planning to have 10 of the large dams constructed.
 
Brazil plans to build 43 large hydropower dams in the Tapajos Basin along Tapajos river and its two branches, the Jurena river and Teles Pires river, turning the waterways into important industrial transportation pathways for transporting agricultural products, mostly soybean. According to Ten-year Energy Expansion Plan 2022, the state of Brazil is planning to have 10 of the large dams constructed.
Line 29: Line 29:
 
|}
 
|}
  
The affected stakeholder in this case study is Munduruku Indigenous peoples who experience the most disruption contributed by the Tapajos dams project and waterway project and had their advices and protest ignored by the federal government. The Munduruku people
+
The affected stakeholder in this case study is Munduruku Indigenous peoples who experience the most disruption contributed by the Tapajos dams project and waterway project and had their advices and protest ignored by the federal government. The long-period residence of Munduruku people positively contributes to Amazon rainforest's ecosystem with Amazonia dark earth, which is a new type of soil with rich nutrient.
  
 
==Interested Outside Stakeholders==
 
==Interested Outside Stakeholders==
Line 72: Line 72:
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
<references/>Fearnside, P. M. (2015). Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil’s Tapajós Basin plans. Ambio, 44(5), 426-439. doi:10.1007/s13280-015-0642-z
+
# <references/>Fearnside, P. M. (2015). Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil’s Tapajós Basin plans. Ambio, 44(5), 426-439. doi:10.1007/s13280-015-0642-z
 
+
#
<references/>Lele, U. J. (2000). Brazil: Forests in the balance: Challenges of conservation with development World Bank Publications.
+
# <references/>Lele, U. J. (2000). Brazil: Forests in the balance: Challenges of conservation with development World Bank Publications.
<references/>Sheffler, E. M., & Southwick, E. E. (1984). Environmental resource management on the Munduruku savanna. Environmental Management, 8(3), 215-220. doi:10.1007/bf01866963
+
# <references/>Sheffler, E. M., & Southwick, E. E. (1984). Environmental resource management on the Munduruku savanna. Environmental Management, 8(3), 215-220. doi:10.1007/bf01866963
 
+
#
<references/>Brazzil. (2017, February 05). Brazil: The Day the Munduruku Found Out the Police Were Not Their Friend. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/brazil-the-day-the-munduruku-found-out-the-police-were-not-their-friend/
+
# <references/>Brazzil. (2017, February 05). Brazil: The Day the Munduruku Found Out the Police Were Not Their Friend. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/brazil-the-day-the-munduruku-found-out-the-police-were-not-their-friend/
 
+
#
Brazzil. (2016, June 19). Brazil’s Munduruku Indians Start a Movement to Save an Amazon Tributary. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/23955-brazil-s-munduruku-indians-start-a-movement-to-save-an-amazon-tributary/
+
# Brazzil. (2016, June 19). Brazil’s Munduruku Indians Start a Movement to Save an Amazon Tributary. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/23955-brazil-s-munduruku-indians-start-a-movement-to-save-an-amazon-tributary/
 
+
#
Munduruku: Weaving Resistance. (2014). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from https://vimeo.com/112230009
+
# Munduruku: Weaving Resistance. (2014). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from https://vimeo.com/112230009
 
+
#
Wildlife Conservation Society. Tapajós. (n.d.). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://amazonwaters.org/basins/great-sub-basins/tapajos/
+
# Wildlife Conservation Society. Tapajós. (n.d.). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://amazonwaters.org/basins/great-sub-basins/tapajos/
 
+
#
World Rainforest Movement. The Mundukuru peoples in Brazil: forestry concessions imposed on indigenous lands. (2015, September 15). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://wrm.org.uy/articles-from-the-wrm-bulletin/section1/the-mundukuru-peoples-in-brazil-forestry-concessions-imposed-on-indigenous-lands/
+
# World Rainforest Movement. The Mundukuru peoples in Brazil: forestry concessions imposed on indigenous lands. (2015, September 15). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://wrm.org.uy/articles-from-the-wrm-bulletin/section1/the-mundukuru-peoples-in-brazil-forestry-concessions-imposed-on-indigenous-lands/
  
  

Revision as of 16:38, 7 December 2017

Munduruku Indigenous People versus forest concessions in the Tapajós region, Para state, Brazil

This case study reveals the conflicts between Munduruku indigenous peoples and Brazil federal government about a forest area in the Tapajos region, Para state, Brazil. Along the Tapajos river, Brazilian government was planning to build 43 hydropower dams, which would damage the rainforest ecosystem and flood the indigenous land lived by Munduruku peoples for centuries. A series of documentations present how indigenous people and the authorities view the forest with different values, leading to the disagreements upon the decisions made. Ignorance on the petition of recognition of indigenous land and continuing the hydropower plans has prompted protest and violent repressions due to future destruction at Munduruku territory, which holds the history and cultural of Munduruku people. With the support of local ministry, Munduruku people stand up and defend their rights of the forests and forest from other interest stakeholders. This case study requires future monitoring since the conflicts started in

Introduction

Loaction

This case study is focused in Tapajos region, which located in between the states of Mato Grosso and Para within the Amazon rainforest zone, Brazil. The Tapajos river basin covers around 492,000 km2 of the Amazon. The biodiversity and geographic characteristic of Amazon rainforest is a natural history, as well as a cultural history.

The Mundurukus

The Munduruku indigenous people have been living in the Amazon region for thousands of years before the arrival and colonization of European. The Munduruku culture and history are memorized and passed down to the next generation with their traditional knowledge of agriculture, their customary land and sacred sites of Sete Quedas at Tapajos basin. Although the population is separated into several groups, there are about 12,000 Munduruku Indians lived by the Tapajos river now.

The Tapajos dams

Brazil plans to build 43 large hydropower dams in the Tapajos Basin along Tapajos river and its two branches, the Jurena river and Teles Pires river, turning the waterways into important industrial transportation pathways for transporting agricultural products, mostly soybean. According to Ten-year Energy Expansion Plan 2022, the state of Brazil is planning to have 10 of the large dams constructed.

Tenure arrangements

Tenure arrangements. Describe the nature of the tenure: freehold or forest management agreement/arrangements, duration, etc.


Administrative arrangements

Since 1960s, the government-instituted policies and projects are sought to develop Amazon in the aspects of infrastructure and economic activity. 1988 constitution guaranteed the rights of indigenous populations: right to be consulted before changes related to indigenous land happen. Forest concession is a relatively new instrument in Brazil introduced by the federal government, and the recent concession is granted to logging companies without noticing the indigenous people

Affected Stakeholders

Stakeholder Main Relevant Objective Relative Power
Munduruku People
  • Gain official demarcation from Brazil federal government
  • Against forest concession granted to logging companies in Tapajos Basin
Low

The affected stakeholder in this case study is Munduruku Indigenous peoples who experience the most disruption contributed by the Tapajos dams project and waterway project and had their advices and protest ignored by the federal government. The long-period residence of Munduruku people positively contributes to Amazon rainforest's ecosystem with Amazonia dark earth, which is a new type of soil with rich nutrient.

Interested Outside Stakeholders

Stakeholders Main Relevant Objectives Relative Power
Brazilian Government
  • Conercion and violence are being abused to suppress their resistance movement during decision-making process
  • Building Tapajos dam are essential for Brazil's economic development
  • Construction of waterway along with the dams on Tapajos river for soybean transportation (chained with dams)
  • Granting forest concession to private logging companies
High
Public Federal Ministry (MPF) of Para State
  • Support Munduruku and starts taking legal action (calling for tender) in March 2015
  • Pressured the federal government of Brazil for concluding the formal recognition of Sawre Muybu land (traditionally used by Mundurukus)
Relatively high
Greenpeace --an independent campaigning organization
  • Joint with an Munduruku community in an unofficial demarcation
  • Support the Munduruku to save their land from the construction of Tapajos dams by calling equipment companies to reject Tapajos dams project
Low-Medium
Logging Companies Gaining forest concession for logging Low

Discussion

A discussion of the aims and intentions of the community forestry project and your assessment of relative successes or failures. You should also include a discussion of critical issues or conflicts in this community and how they are being managed


Assessment

Your assessment of the relative power of each group of social actors, and how that power is being used


Recommendations

Your recommendations about this community forestry project


References

  1. Fearnside, P. M. (2015). Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil’s Tapajós Basin plans. Ambio, 44(5), 426-439. doi:10.1007/s13280-015-0642-z
  2. Lele, U. J. (2000). Brazil: Forests in the balance: Challenges of conservation with development World Bank Publications.
  3. Sheffler, E. M., & Southwick, E. E. (1984). Environmental resource management on the Munduruku savanna. Environmental Management, 8(3), 215-220. doi:10.1007/bf01866963
  4. Brazzil. (2017, February 05). Brazil: The Day the Munduruku Found Out the Police Were Not Their Friend. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/brazil-the-day-the-munduruku-found-out-the-police-were-not-their-friend/
  5. Brazzil. (2016, June 19). Brazil’s Munduruku Indians Start a Movement to Save an Amazon Tributary. Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://brazzil.com/23955-brazil-s-munduruku-indians-start-a-movement-to-save-an-amazon-tributary/
  6. Munduruku: Weaving Resistance. (2014). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from https://vimeo.com/112230009
  7. Wildlife Conservation Society. Tapajós. (n.d.). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://amazonwaters.org/basins/great-sub-basins/tapajos/
  8. World Rainforest Movement. The Mundukuru peoples in Brazil: forestry concessions imposed on indigenous lands. (2015, September 15). Retrieved November 01, 2017, from http://wrm.org.uy/articles-from-the-wrm-bulletin/section1/the-mundukuru-peoples-in-brazil-forestry-concessions-imposed-on-indigenous-lands/




Seekiefer (Pinus halepensis) 9months-fromtop.jpg
This conservation resource was created by Course:FRST270.