Documentation:Vantage College Curriculum/Multidisciplinary Research Project

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Vantage College Multidisciplinary Research Project

This page is used to develop the curricula proposals for the UBC Vantage College Multidisciplinary Research Project. The sections below are drawn from the course content forms that are required for submission to the UBC curricula committee.

Description

     Proposed Calendar Entry: (40 word limit.)

VANT 148(WT1/WT2 - 2 credits) Vantage College Project

Year-long project linked to topics explored in Vantage College program curricula. Runs across Terms 1-2.

VANT 149(ST1/ST2 - 1 credit) Multidisciplinary Capstone Research Project

First year research project that culminates in student-led conference and research presentation.

Pre-requisites:

VANT 148: None. Restricted to Vantage College students.

VANT 149: VANT 148

Action: Create New Course

     Rationale for Proposed Change:

The UBC strategic plan, Place and Promise, outlines UBC's commitment to students to provide them with Enriched Educational Experiences (E3s) during their course of study. In their report on E3s at UBC, Sens and Fryer (2012) state that, "Ultimately, the goal is to position educational enrichment practices as a key element of curriculum design, faculty teaching, student development, and student learning expectations." The UBC Vantage College project courses (VANT 148, VANT149) provide students with enriched educational experiences that help to distinguish the International Program. By integrating learning from multiple sources, in team projects and with peer instruction, UBC Vantage College students will use this project element of the International Program to build and engage with learning communities.

References

Rationale VANT 148

  • Provide students with opportunities to extend and enrich discipline specific classroom learning;
  • Assist students with transitioning to University and undertaking apprentice scholarship;
  • Provide students with the opportunity to engage in multidisciplinary ways of knowing;
  • Provide students with an opportunity to apply course concepts through project-based learning, including the creation of learning artifacts for both peers and the wider UBC community;
  • Provide students with additional opportunities for acquiring and improving English for Academic Purposes;
  • Provides students with the opportunity to work with faculty mentor; and
  • Motivate and inspire students to pursue courses of their interest in 2nd year.

Rationale VANT 149

  • Provide the opportunity for students to participate in multidisciplinary discussions regarding current theories and issues with their peers both within and outside their selected discipline.
  • Provide an opportunity for students to extend their classroom learning by formulating and proposing a guided, collaborative, novice research project.
  • Provide opportunity to research and present to their peers as apprentice scholars at the capstone conference.
  • Create additional opportunities for students to acquire professional skills, including event planning, networking, leadership and teamwork.
  • Create additional opportunities for students to acquire and improve their English for Academic Purposes skills.

Course Information

      A.Expanded course description, (including: rationale for course, intended users, # of students
      B.Course objectives (What concepts or topics will be covered?) 
      C.Potential instructors (list of potential instructors and their suitability and readiness to teach)

Course Description

Projects linked to topics explored in UBC Vantage College International Program curricula.


Intended Audience

Restricted to Vantage College students

Course Topics and Structure: VANT 148

Example of Weekly Themes for Common Lecture Series, Science Program, 2014W Term 1 (Vantage College program courses: CHEM121, LLED200, MATH100/110, PHYS107):

Week 1-3: Using Modeling in Science (e.g., Abstractions, Equations, Structures)

Week 4-5: Growth and Decay (e.g., Radiocarbon Dating, Currents, Language Development, Kinetic Energy)

Week 6-7: Case Scenario (e.g., Guest Lecture from Computer Science & Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences)

Week 8-9: What is 'Stuff'? (e.g. Modern View of Matter, Energy)

Week 10-11: Optimization and Equilibrium (e.g., Chemical Reactions, Motion, Plateau's Problem)

Week 12-13: Laws of Nature (e.g., Axioms, Thermodynamics, Ideal Gas Law)


Example of Weekly Themes for Common Lecture Series, Science Program, 2014W Term 2 (Vantage College program courses: LLED201, MATH101, PHYS108/109, SCIE113):

Week 1-3: What is data? (e.g., Simulations, Experiments, Observations)

Week 4-5: Abstraction in Science (e.g., Magnetic Fields, Logic, Induction)

Week 6-7: Case Scenario (e.g., Guest Lectures Computer Science/Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences)

Week 8-9: Symmetry (e.g., Molecular shape, Motion, Charge)

Week 10-11: Systems that Change (e.g. Differential Equations, Population growth, Acceleration)

Week 12-13: Case Scenarios - Science in Everyday Life (e.g., How does an MRI work?)


Example of Weekly Themes for Arts Program, 2014W Term 1 (Vantage College program courses: GEOG121, LLED200, POLI100, PSYC102, WRDS150):

Week 1-2: Defining Social Sciences and Social Science Research

Week 3-4: What is data? What are methods?

Week 5: What Can I do with a Social Science Degree?

Week 6-7: Education and Learning in International Contexts

Week 8-9: Disciplinary Perspectives on Globalization

Week 10-11: Global Economies and Politics

Week 12-13: Globalization and Health


Example of Weekly Themes for Arts Program, 2014W Term 2 (Vantage College program courses: GEOG122, LLED200, POLI220, PSYC208, WRDS150):

Week 1-3: Citizenship: Issues of Concern for a Global Citizen

Week 4-5: Social Justice Movements

Week 6-7: Social Science and First Nations Studies

Week 8-9: Aboriginal Community Action

Week 10-11: Doing Social Science Research in the ‘Real’ World: Enacting Change

Week 12-13: Becoming Disciplinary Citizens: Broadening the Purposes and Audiences of Your Course Work


Potential Instructors

Dr. Steven Barnes, Instructor, Psychology

CK Choi 173, 604-827-3768

steven.barnes@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Joanne Fox, Senior Instructor, Michael Smith Laboratories and Microbiology and Immunology

Director, Vantage College Science Program

CK Choi 166, 604-827-0339

joanne.fox@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Joss Ives, Instructor, Physics

CK Choi 172, 604-827-2619

joss.ives@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Anka Lekhi, Instructor, Chemistry

Chemistry D218, 604-827-3492

anka.lekhi@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Fok-Shuen Leung, Instructor, Mathematics

CK Choi 174, 604-827-2149

fok-shuen.leung@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Siobhán McPhee, Instructor, Geography

CK Choi 171, 604-827-2077

siobhan.mcphee@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Jenny Peterson, Instructor, Political Science

CK Choi 167, 604 827 1597

jenny.peterson@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Jaclyn Rea, Instructor, Arts Studies

Arts Academic Writing Coordinator

CK Choi 162, 604-827-3765

jackie.rea@vantagecollege.ubc.ca


Dr. Georg Rieger, Instructor, Physics

CK Choi 172, 604-827-2619

georg.rieger@vantagecollege.ubc.ca

Academic English Program Instructors

A team of full-time instructors with specialized training in English for Academic Purposes will be hired as 12-month lecturers to support this project course. The team will be coordinated by the Academic English Program Director, Dr. Sandra Zappa, Assistant Professor, Language and Literacy Education. Academic English Program (AEP) instructors will also work closely with the corresponding content area instructors to enhance the cohesiveness of the language-content connections made and the support provided for this project course.

Course Format

      (How is the course structured  (e.g., method of presentation of course material,  
      labs, tutorials, Connect, active learning, field experience etc.? 
      What amount of time is devoted to each approach?)

VANT 148 (WT1/WT2)

This course runs across both terms in the Winter Session.

1 hour/week Common Lecture Series in each stream of the International Program (e.g. Science Stream or Arts Stream)

With these colloquia delivered by UBC Vantage College content faculty, the aim is to contextualize each week and introduce crosscutting themes in a shared classroom experience for the whole cohort of UBC Vantage College students in each stream of the International Program. Content instructors and Academic English Program instructors would be present during these multi-disciplinary colloquia sessions. Each stream in the International Program would have their own lecture series that may include guest speakers and/or experiential learning activities (e.g. field trip).

1 hour/week Project Mentor Meeting, each content instructor is assigned a group of UBC Vantage College students to mentor from within the relevant stream of the International program (groups of 25 or 40 students, 1 faculty).

In this Project Mentor Meeting, content instructors would support UBC Vantage College students by providing mentorship. Instructors would guide students through a series of activities and assessments that support VANT 148 learning outcomes (see Learning Outcomes below).

VANT 149 (ST)

  • 1 hr/week workshop, LLED guided support
  • 1 hr/week workshop, small group mentorship (25 or 40 students, 1 faculty)

Course Schedule

      (A tentative schedule of the topics to be covered on a weekly basis)


Mentorship activities/Assessment

Term One

Term One Schedule
Week Mentorship activities Assessment
1 Introduction to scholarship
2 Keeping a journal Notetaking assignment starts
3 Identifying concepts
4 Assessing concepts Assignment 1: Guided discipline-specific mini-project 1
5 Intro to peer review
6 Revising your work
7 Accessing library resources
8 Preparing lit reviews
9 Preparing lit reviews Assignment 2: Guided discipline-specific mini-project 2
10 Preparing lit reviews
11 Peer review activity
12 Revising your work Assignment 3: Guided literature review
13 Summarizing and reflecting Assignment 4: Note taking - Ongoing throughout WT1 & WT2

Assignment 5: First term summary of journal (completion check only)

Term Two

Term Two Schedule
Week Mentorship activities Assessment
1 Multidisciplinary approaches to research Note taking assignment starts
2 Multidisciplinary approaches to research
3 Developing research questions
4 Developing research questions
5 Developing research questions Assignment 6: Multidisciplinary mini-project
6 Presenting your work Assignment 9: mini-presentation
7 Presenting your work Assignment 9: mini-presentation
8 Working with data
9 Working with data
10 Working with data
11 Conducting research
12 Conducting research Assignment 8: Written journal
13 Summarizing and reflecting Assignment 7: Note taking - Ongoing in both WT1 & WT2

Assignment 10: Proposing research question

Term Three

Based on the premise that VANT 149 would begin before the offical ST1: i.e. using a compressed timeline between WT2 & ST1, possibly 3rd week of April because we don't need a full 3 weeks for exams. This timeline needs to be confirmed.

Term Three Schedule
Week Mentorship activities Assessment
1 Working with data (Maybe leave this all in WT2?) I would say yes to leaving it for Term 2
2 Preparing proposals/Organizing a conference
3 Preparing proposals/Organizing a conference Assignment 1: Project proposal
4 Organizing a conference
5 Summarizing research results
6 Preparing abstracts
7 Preparing abstracts
8 Presentation skills Assignment 2: Data summary
9 Presentation skills
10 Presentation skills
11 Building a professional profile Assignment 3: Video abstract
12 Building a professional profile Assignment 4: Conference presentation

Learning Outcomes

     (What skills or knowledge will students acquire?  Phrased as bullet points following the statement “By the end 
      of the course, students will be able to…”.  Learning Outcomes should be linked to assessments.)

Project learning outcomes

VANT 148 (WT1/WT2)

By the end of VANT 148, students will be able to:

  1. understand key disciplinary differences, particularly methodological differences;
  2. use library retrieval methods to obtain and filter information for a relevant research context;
  3. define, discuss, argue for and apply the elements of discipline-specific thinking when communicating with a specialist or non-specialist, in context of both the learner’s life and within broader society;
  4. describe current research (and related issues, concerns, debates) using disciplinary frameworks and extract the main results or conclusions from a published paper or journal article;
  5. take on a variety of roles in formal and informal situations, including being able to work in teams or independently while developing the skills necessary to be an independent learner and to foster individual agency when performing course work; and
  6. contribute to broader discipline-specific discussions in a variety of modes (oral, technological, visual, written).

VANT 149 (ST1/ST2)

By the end of VANT 149, students will be able to:

  1. engage, as novice participants, in discipline-specific research work
  2. define, discuss, argue for and apply the elements of discipline-specific thinking when communicating with a specialist or non-specialist, in context of both the learner’s life and within broader society.
  3. identify central differences and areas of overlap in disciplinary approaches.
  4. contribute to discipline-specific and multidisciplinary discussions in a variety of modes (oral, technological, visual, written).
  5. identify themselves as apprentice scholars and bring that perspective to their interpersonal interactions within both Vantage College and the broader UBC community.
  6. collaborate with peers to organize a multidisciplinary conference
  7. present research project to a multidisciplinary audience

Sample Materials

Sample materials to support the above goals/outcomes

Assessment Criteria and Grading

      (Is the course graded on a numeric (percentage) or pass/fail basis?  
      What assignments, mid-terms, or exams will be required of students?  
      How do the course assessments fulfill the stated learning outcomes?  
      What will each component of the course assessment be worth (mark breakdown?)  
      What will be the criteria? Include grading rubrics for non-exam based 
      assessments such as oral presentations, papers, etc.

Evaluation

Assessment Summary (Sample rubrics provided at end of this section)

  • Assignment 1: Guided discipline-specific mini-project (5%) [Learning outcomes: 1,2,3]

The first mini project will be based on course work or concepts covered in one of the disciplinary courses in the UBC Vantage College International Program streams. Students can choose the particular discipline that they would like to focus on for this first project. This mini project allows students to demonstrate understanding of a concept covered in class. Topic choice is guided by the instructor. The format of this project may include, but is not limited to, visuals, frequently asked questions, digital explanations, etc. Students complete this mini-project in groups.

  • Assignment 2: Guided discipline-specific mini-project (5%) [Learning outcomes: 1,2,3]

The second mini project will be based on course work or concepts covered in one of the disciplinary courses in UBC Vantage College International Program streams. Students will choose a different discipline to focus on for this second project. This mini project allows students to demonstrate understanding of a concept covered in class. Topic choice is guided by the instructor. The format of this project may include, but is not limited to, visuals, frequently asked questions, digital explanations, etc. Students complete this second project individually and present their work to peers.

  • Assignment 3: Guided literature review (15%) [Learning outcomes: 1,2,4]

Students will carry out a literature review choosing a topic that interests them and extends topics covered in course work. Students will also be asked to justify how their topic connects with concepts covered in their disciplinary course work. This literature review assignment provides students with practice using literature searching tools and library resources. Working in groups, students can choose to complete this assignment focusing on a topic that they wish to further pursue in their capstone research project [VANT 149].

  • Assignment 4: Note taking (10%) [Learning outcomes: 1,4]

This note-taking exercise is linked to the lecture series. During the lecture series, students will complete a worksheet to identify connections between the cross cutting themes of the lectures and their course content. Working individually, students will identify the main points presented and generate questions that emerge from the lecture series. Occurs in both Term 1 & Term 2.

  • Assignment 5: Written journal (20%) [Learning outcomes: 4,5]

Students will summarize their learning and justify their project ideas with journal entries in Connect. This journal allows for reflection on their progress, synthesis of course concepts, and awareness of future interests and goals. This journal begins a process and creates a building block that works towards student generated capstone research project proposals. Occurs in both Term 1 & Term 2; Instructors will provide feedback in both Terms.

  • Assignment 6: Multidisciplinary mini-project (15%) [Learning outcomes: 1,2,3]

The third mini project will build on course work, concepts covered and/or project work covered in Term 1. Students can choose topic that they would like to focus on for this third project and will be encouraged to adopt a disciplinary perspective for which they have not already done a mini project. This mini project allows students to extend their understanding of a concept covered in class. Students would complete this project individually and would have the opportunity to present their work to peers.

  • Assignment 7: Mini presentation (5%) [Learning outcomes: 3,4,6]

Students prepare a short oral presentation on a topic covered in one of their mini projects. Individual students deliver these mini lessons to small groups of their peers and practice giving and receiving peer feedback. This assignment gives students practice with oral presentations, reinforces learning, and fosters learning communities.

  • Assignment 8: Proposing research questions (25%) [Learning outcomes: 5,6]

Students identify possible research questions that interest them and draw from at least two disciplines included in the UBC Vantage College International Program streams (e.g.PHYS/MATH, GEOG/POLI). In this written proposal, students reframe these questions in their own words and cite literature to provide context for the questions. This assignment prepares students for VANT 149.

There is no mid-term or final exam in this course.


VANT 149 (ST1/ST2)

  • Assignment 1: Project proposal (10%) [Learning outcomes: 1,2]

Students prepare a research project proposal based on the list of possible questions identified in VANT 148. The research proposal draws from at least two disciplines in their UBC Vantage College course streams (e.g. PHYS/MATH, GEOG/POLI). In this written proposal, students build upon their previous work to articulate the scope and rationale for the project they wish to pursue in preparation for their research activity.

  • Assignment 2: Data summary (15%) [Learning outcomes: 1,4]

In this written assignment, students present their research results including an interpretation of data that they collected.

  • Assignment 3: Video abstract (10%) [Learning outcomes: 3,4]

In the video abstract, students prepare a three to five minute video abstract (or equivalent multi-modal format) that provides an overview of their research project, findings and any conclusions they draw. The video abstract should be suitable for both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

  • Assignment 4: Conference organization (15%) [Learning outcomes: 2,3]

Under the supervision of faculty mentors and course tutors, students will be responsible for planning and organizing the capstone conference. Students will be assessed through a combination of self and peer assessment based on participation in and contributions to team-based conference organizing committees.

  • Assignment 5: Conference presentation (35%) [Learning outcomes: 2,3,4]

Students prepare a short oral presentation, poster presentation, panel discussion, or workshop on their research project, which will presented at the capstone conference.

  • Assignment 6: Participation (15%) [Learning outcomes: 4]

The participation component will be based on a student’s ongoing engagement with both the faculty mentor and other students and will assess active engagement in and contributions to both individual and team components of the course.


There is no mid-term or final exam in this course.

Sample rubrics

File:Rubric for Oral Presentations of Student Capstone Projects - Interdisciplinary.pdf

File:Sample Grading Rubric For Literature Review.pdf

Examples of Selected Course Readings

Readings will include selected excerpts from the resources such as the following:

  • Bell, J. (2005). Doing your research project: A guide for first-time researchers in education and social science: 4th edition. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.
  • Blaxter, L., Hughes, C., and Tight, M. (2006). How to Research: 3rd edition. Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.
  • Booth, W. C., Colomb, G. G., & Williams, J. M. (1995). The craft of research. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  • Davis, W. (1999). Shadows in the Sun. New York, NY: Random Books.
  • Jones, M. (2008). International students' cross-cultural experiences of learning. International Journal of Asia-Pacific Studies, 4(2), 39-71.
  • Verschuren, P., & Doorewaard, H. (2010). Designing a Research Project. Portland, OR: Eleven International Publishing.


Additonal readings for Arts students will include selected excerpts from resources such as the following:

  • Lightfoot, S. (Forthcoming). Indigenous mobilisation and activism in the UN system. In the Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights. Damien Short and Corinne Lennox (Eds). New York: Routledge.
  • Wong, J. (2004). Are the learning styles of Asian international students culturally or contextually based? International Education Journal, 4(4), 154-166.

Budget Impact

      (New Courses: explain the resources necessary for the course 
      and how the budget for new course will be accommodated within your academic unit.