Course:KIN366/ConceptLibrary/Dribbling

From UBC Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Movement Experiences for Children
Wiki.png
KIN 366
Section:
Instructor: Dr. Shannon S.D. Bredin
Email:
Office:
Office Hours:
Class Schedule:
Classroom:
Important Course Pages
Syllabus
Lecture Notes
Assignments
Course Discussion


Dribbling is a fundamental movement skill and a form of object manipulation [1]. It is a common form of locomotion for the ball carrier in many sports, such as basketball, hockey, and soccer. Dribbling is utilized by the ball carrier in sport to move across the playing area while avoiding opposition. The development of dribbling skills is important for successful locomotion while playing. Dribbling may be done with the body or an implement, dependent on the sport. Dribbling in basketball uses the hands, soccer uses the feet, and hockey uses a hockey stick [1].

Definition

Dribbling is the ability to go from one’s original position to their destination while maintaining possession of the ball.

Phases of Progression

When learning to dribble, the learner will progress through a sequence of phases dependent on which form of dribbling is being learned.

Hand Dribbling [2]

Initial Phase

During the initial phase, the dribbler will:

  • bounce the ball with both hands and with stiff fingers in a downward push
  • bounce and catch ball between each dribble
  • bounce the ball at various heights

Transition Phase

During the transition phase, the dribbler will:

  • bounce the ball with one hand
  • slap the ball instead of pushing it downwards
  • have their eyes are focused on the ball
  • bounce the ball in a manner that is inconsistent and difficult to control

Mature Phase

During the mature phase, the dribbler will:

  • maintaining dribbling at waist height
  • push the ball downwards with full extension of elbow, wrist, and fingers
  • dribble with control utilizing with relaxed fingers

Dribbling with the Feet [2]

Initial Phase

During the initial phase, the dribbler will:

  • move while kicking the ball with their toes or with the front of their foot
  • kick the ball in random directions and distances

Transition Phase

During the transition phase, the dribbler will:

  • moves while kicking the ball with their toes or the side of their foot
  • dribble with the ball remaining near their feet
  • chase after the ball to regain control
  • have their eyes remain on the ball, with occasional glances towards field

Mature Phase

During the mature phase, the dribbler will:

  • push the ball laterally or forwards utilizing either side of the foot
  • have the ball remain near the foot during dribble
  • utilize their foot to control the direction of the ball
  • have their eyes alternate between the field and the ball

Dribbling with an Implement [2]

Initial Phase

During the initial phase, the dribbler will:

  • have a tendency to hold implement with one hand
  • hit the ball forward instead of pushing it forward
  • hold the implement in front of the body
  • have little to no directional control
  • have their eyes focused on the ball or the implement

Transition Phase

During the transition phase, the dribbler will:

  • hold the top of the implement with both hands
  • push the ball forwards using either side of the implement
  • have better directional control
  • have tendency to chase ball
  • have their eyes focused on the ball or implement

Mature Phase

During the mature phase, the dribbler will:

  • hold the implement at the top with their non-dominant hand and with their dominant hand lower down the shaft of the implement
  • dribble with a forward leaning and slight knee bent posture
  • control the ball maintaining a close distance to the implement
  • push the ball forwards using either side of the implement
  • have their eyes alternate focus between the ball and the field

Benefits

Dribbling shares many benefits with other fundamental movement skills. Developing fundamental movement skills helps improve a child’s self-perception of their physical abilities [3]. Higher self-efficacy in dribbling will result in more participation in sport, and may lead to lifetime participation in physical activity [4]. The locomotor aspect of dribbling in sports also aids in development of cardiovascular endurance and leg muscular endurance. A complex skill such as dribbling also aids in the development of agility and coordination [1]. Dribbling also helps in reducing asymmetries in bilateral skills [5].

Advice for coaches/educators

Things to watch out for when teaching dribbling:

  • When working on the developing bilateral symmetry in dribbling, practicing utilizing the non-dominant side before training the dominant side is most effective [6].
  • Focus on stationary dribbling skills prior to introducing movement to the activity.
  • Begin with a larger ball when developing dribbling, and utilize a progressively smaller ball as they improve.
  • When learning hand dribbling, vary the type of dribbling as they improve. For example, they may dribble between the legs, with higher frequency, with lower frequency [2]. Adding another ball will also help improve bilateral skills.
  • Practice dribbling against a live opponent. Dribbling in game situations can be simulated by doing cone drills with defenders acting as the cones that the dribbler must move past. The defenders have one leg acting as a pivot that they are allowed to move around. This increases the difficulty of the drill.
  • Utilize easily recognizable learning cues focusing on the basics for each form of dribbling:
  • For Soccer: sides of foot, head up
  • For Basketball: fingertips, stay low, head up

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Canadian Sport for Life. (2011). Retrieved from http://canadiansportforlife.ca/
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Object control skills. (2013). In FMS Kit for parents. Retrieved from http://sportonkids.com.sg
  3. Robinson, L. E. (2011), The relationship between perceived physical competence andfundamental motor skills in preschool children. Child: Care, Health and Development, 37: 589–596. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2214.2010.01187.x
  4. Beets, M.W. & Pitetti, K.H. (2005). Contribution of physical education and sport to health- related fitness in high school students. Journal of School Health, 75(1) 25-30.
  5. Texeira, L.A., Silva, M.V., Carvalho, M.A. (2003). Reduction of lateral asymmetries in dribbling: The role of bilateral practice. Laterality, 8, 53-65.
  6. Stöckel, T., Weigelt, M., & Krug, J. (2011). Acquisition of a complex basketball-dribbling task in school children as a function of bilateral practice order. Res Q Exerc Sport, 82, 188-97. Striking with Hands. (2012). In Manipulative skills. Retrieved from http://www.sportnz.org.nz/Documents/Young%20People/P_5620-3_SPC_A4_4_manipulative-ff_WEB_hands.pdf