Community Service Learning

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There are numerous definitions of community service learning (CSL), but essentially, CSL or ‘service learning’ refers to a model of experiential learning that combines classroom learning with volunteer work that achieves community goals. Real-life experiences in the community are linked to academic content through processes of critical reflection such as journal writing, small group discussion, and writing analytical papers.

CSL has Three Key Elements:

  1. Voluntary (i.e., unpaid) work in community settings that achieves goals or meets priorities identified by the community
  2. Academic content that relates to the nature of the service
  3. Structured reflection activities that encourage students to make connections between what they are studying and what they are experiencing in the community

Related Resources at UBC

Bibliography

Link to Complete Bibliography
For a complete bibliography, please visit the CTLT's shared folder on Refworks.

Having problems? Visit the RefWorks information guide.


  • d'Arlach, L., Sanchez, B., & Feuer, R. (2009). Voices from the community: A case for reciprocity in service-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 16(1), 5-16. link={{{link}}}
  • Crabtree, R. D. (2008). Theoretical foundations for international service-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 15(1), 18-36. link={{{link}}}
  • Leung, K., Liu, W., Wang, W., & Chen, C. (2007). Factors affecting students' evaluation in a community service-learning program. Advances in Health Sciences Education, 12(4), 475-490. link={{{link}}}
  • Mitchell, T. D. (2008). Traditional vs. critical service-learning: Engaging the literature to differentiate two models. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 14(2), 50-65. link={{{link}}}
  • Moely, B. E., Furco, A., & Reed, J. (2008). Charity and social change: The impact of individual preferences on service-learning outcomes. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 15(1), 37-48. link={{{link}}}
  • O'Meara, K., & Niehaus, E. (2009). Service-learning is... how faculty explain their practice.Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 16(1), 17-32. link={{{link}}}
  • Poindexter, S., Arnold, P., & Osterhout, C. (2009). Service-learning from a distance: Partnering multiple universities and local governments in a large scale initiative. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 15(2), 56-67. link={{{link}}}
  • Polin, D. K., & Keene, A. S. (2010). Bringing an ethnographic sensibility to service-learning assessment. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 16(2), 22-37. link={{{link}}}
  • Worrall, L. (2007). Asking the community: A case study of community partner perspectives. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 14(1), 5-17. link={{{link}}}


See Also

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